LONGWOOD, VICTORIA 3665

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G’day from Australia.

If you’re one of my many DNA Connections I’d love to hear from you.

Link with me via

Gary Patton's Family Tree Project
Or
www.garypatton.net
Or
Gary Ian Patton
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3 weeks ago

Gary Patton's Family Tree Project
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Chapter: Patton's, Vikings Who Conquered The World

As we traverse the historical landscape of the Patton family, their story intertwines with the broader tapestry of medieval England, offering insights into the socio-political dynamics, cultural shifts, and global events that shaped their journey. Amidst the lush fields of Wainfleet, Lincolnshire, England, where Richard "Barbour" Patten established roots, the Norman Conquest of 1066 serves as a backdrop—a seismic event that awarded the Patton ancestors lands from Duke William of Normandy, better known as "William The Conqueror."

The Patton saga unfolds against the canvas of medieval England, marked by the Battle of Hastings in 1066. This pivotal moment not only secured the Norman grip on England but also propelled families like the Pattons into prominence. Strategic marriages, such as Richard "Barbour" Patten's union with Margery, daughter of Sir William Brereton, illuminate the interconnected web of aristocratic alliances that defined medieval society.

William Waynflete's role as Lord Chancellor of England adds a layer of political significance to the Patton narrative. Born in Waynflete in 1398, Waynflete's era coincided with the tumultuous reigns of Henry V and Henry VI. His influence reached beyond familial pursuits, shaping the political and intellectual landscape of his time.

The Scottish branch of the Pattons introduces another dimension, reflecting the broader historical currents that swept across the British Isles. As John Paton of Dunfermline, John Paton of Muckart, and George Patton navigated the Scottish highlands, their lives intersected with the dynamic tapestry of Scottish history, including events like the Wars of Scottish Independence.

The medieval world was not merely a stage for familial pursuits but a complex arena where individuals, like the Pattons, navigated a landscape shaped by war, political intrigue, and cultural evolution. Their footsteps echo through the corridors of time, providing a microcosm of the broader historical forces that molded medieval England and Scotland.

In weaving the Patton narrative, we unravel a tale of resilience, adaptation, and influence—a story that extends beyond familial lines to become a reflection of the broader historical forces that shaped the medieval world. The Pattons, like the Vikings of old, conquered not only lands but also the currents of history, leaving an indelible mark on the narrative of medieval England.
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In the heart of Chelmsford, England, the roots of the Patton family extend through the centuries, tracing back to Richard Patten of the venerable Patten House. As we embark on a journey through four decades of meticulous research, the tapestry of the Patton, Paton, Patoun, Patowne, and their various spellings unfurls.

Amidst the annals of history, the Patton lines weave a complex tale, with some branches remaining elusive, awaiting the touch of genealogical connection. Inserted into this narrative are the enigmatic "sons" of the "unlinked," each representing a distinct lineage within the comprehensive research, a puzzle awaiting resolution.

Nicholas Patten of Waynflete serves as a generational anchor, a crossroads where uncharted paths diverge. Some have found cohesion, joining the familial tapestry, while others linger as unresolved threads, challenging the researcher's quest for a common ancestor. Dates, meticulously added, promise to unveil the intricate web of intermarriages among the Paton/Patton families.

In the digital age, the DNA trail emerges as a crucial guide, revealing connections across oceans and continents. Families in Australia and the U.S.A. find their place within this grand tapestry through the strands of genetic heritage. The journey, however, is far from complete; in July 2022, the quest extends to the realm of Y DNA, an endeavor aimed at unraveling the remaining mysteries.

The Patton saga began in the crucible of the Battle of Hastings in 1066, where they distinguished themselves under the banner of Duke William of Normandy, known as "William The Conqueror" or "William The Bastard." The spoils of victory included coveted lands, bestowed upon the Patton family by their liege lord, forging a legacy that echoes through the corridors of time.

This is but the first chapter of an epic familial odyssey, where history, meticulous research, and the strands of DNA converge to unveil the rich tapestry of the Patton legacy.
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Over 1000 years of our Patton Family History.

Scandinavia (Norsemen) “Men of the North”
England- 1066 - 1600 (534 years)
Scotland- 1600 - 1846 (246 years)
Australia- 1846 (178 years)
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Happy 9th Wedding Anniversary to my beautiful wife Pitinan
I love you Baby.
You really did save my life ❤️❤️❤️
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Imagine the surprise of a BillionGraves volunteer when she stepped into a circle of bushes at a cemetery in Indiana and saw this crying angel.

The original Angel of Grief was a sculpture created in 1894 by William Wetmore Story to adorn the grave of his wife, Emelyn Story, at Protestant Cemetery in Rome, Italy.

Story was a sculptor who had spent a lifetime creating beautiful works of art, but in the year following the loss of his wife, he lost interest in his work as he grieved. His children, hoping to rekindle an interest in life in their father, suggested that he create a sculpture for their mother’s grave.

Most angelic grave art inspires hope in the afterlife, but this sculpture touches on the pain of the loved ones left behind. Story himself wrote that “It represents the Angel of Grief, in utter abandonment, throwing herself with drooping wings and hidden face over a funeral altar. It represents what I feel. It represents Prostration. Yet to do it helps me.”

The Angel of Grief in Rome has become one of the most copied cemetery sculptures in the world. She even found her way inside the bushes at this obscure cemetery in Indiana.
Learn more about cemetery angels in BillionGraves’ blog post here: blog.billiongraves.com/cemetery-angels/

Would you like to volunteer to take photos of gravestones? Get started at BillionGraves.com/volunteer

Questions? Email us at Volunteer@BillionGraves.com
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Let’s give the gift of health this season! 🙏🎄
www.livegood.com/garyipatton
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A great documentary and questions that we need to ask, particularly of ourselves.

Sounds and vibrations have such a massive impact on us but most of us don’t understand why.

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As I delve deeper into my Patton Family History and discover through my Y-DNA and historical records that not only did we come from Scotland in 1846 but prior to that we were in England, Normandy and Scandinavia (Vikiings). The origin of our name is one of conjecture.

Bardsley in his "Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames" (1901). He quotes Burke's historical matter and adds, as to Richard of Dagenham, "from him the Pattens of Bank Hall, Lancashire claim lineal descent." As to the origin of the name, Patten, he quotes Lower's "Patronymica Britianica" (1860) as being derived from the "son of Patrick, from the nickname Pat or Pate, the diminutive being Patt-in or Patt-en, v. Paton and Pattison. Bardsley dogmatizes "I do not assert that this is true or false. All I say is that the Scottish or North English Pattens have no local derivation but are sons of Patrick."
Meaning we venture to presume that Patten is not a "place-name" and that it is derived from Patrick.
Harrison in his "Surnames in the United Kingdom" (1918) referring to Paton, Patten, Pattin says that "the names are so common in the North of England that there must be another source beside the French name." His construction of the name follows Lower and Bardsley as coming from the old Teutonic base "Pato" which he says is "probably a diminutive of Patrick with the French
suffix "on."
Perhaps the latest of these erudite gentlemen and scholars, not willing to ' break with such illustrious authorities as Lower and Bardsley in pontificating as to Patrick, was throwing out a hint of "another source" in a possible origin of Patten as an occupation name, that is, what the man did for a living.

Pattens, wooden shoes or clogs had been in general use for hundreds of years as a substitute for leather in cold and wet occupations, even by priests on the stone floors of churches (vide Bardsley's reference to the period 1464 A.D. and also the use of pattens by gentlemen generally.

Such clogs were often made of aspen wood, as being the lightest obtainable.
There is a London guild of Patten makers which has come down from ancient days. It is well known that to this day thousands of peasants in France and the Low Countries habitually use pattens, for the same reasons that their remote ancestors did. But as authorities seem to favor a derivation from "pato" as a form of Patrick with a French termination "en" or "in" it is, of course, inevitable that we go along and not conjecture as to whether the Pattens were named from the wooden shoes or the wooden shoes named from the Pattens. To a layman, however, the word seems good old Anglo-Saxon, or perhaps, Norman, any way an occupation name.
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May The Fourth be with you ⚔️⚔️⚔️ ... See MoreSee Less
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Disclaimer - I’ve just come across this information and whilst it appears to provide supporting details that coincide with my research please do not take it as FACT yet. If anyone would like to assist me in investigating it I would be very grateful 😇

Britain during the period from 500 A.D. to 1066 A.D. During this time, Britain was inhabited by various Celtic tribes and was invaded by several Germanic tribes, including the Angles, Saxons, and Jutes. These Germanic tribes eventually established several Anglo-Saxon kingdoms in Britain, which were united under the rule of the Wessex king, Alfred the Great, in the late 9th century.

In 1066 A.D., the Norman Conquest of England took place, which marked a significant turning point in British history. The Norman invasion was led by William the Conqueror, a Norman nobleman who claimed the English throne following the death of King Edward the Confessor. William was successful in his invasion, and he established a new Norman dynasty in England. The Norman Conquest had far-reaching consequences for the country, including the introduction of Norman French as the language of the ruling class and the imposition of a feudal system of government.

Overall, the period from 500 A.D. to 1066 A.D. was a tumultuous time in British history, marked by invasions, wars, and the emergence of new kingdoms and ruling dynasties. While the Patton family may not have been prominent during this time, their history and ancestry are undoubtedly tied to the broader history of Britain during this period.

The Patton family has a rich and fascinating history dating back to the year 1066 A.D. The first recorded member of the family was a Norman knight named Sir Ralph de Pategton who fought in the Battle of Hastings alongside William the Conqueror.

Sir Ralph de Pategton was granted lands in the North of England as a reward for his service to William the Conqueror. Over time, the family name evolved from Pategton to Patton. The Pattons were known for their loyalty to the Crown and their skill as warriors. They became prominent landowners in the North of England and served as knights and soldiers in various conflicts.

One of the most famous members of the Patton family was Sir Robert Patton, who fought in the Crusades in the late 12th century. Sir Robert was known for his bravery in battle and his chivalrous behavior. He was knighted by Richard the Lionheart and was later appointed as the High Sheriff of Northumberland.

In the 14th century, the Patton family faced a challenge to their power and influence when a rival family, the Percys, rose to prominence. The Percys were a powerful and ambitious family who sought to dominate the North of England. The Pattons were forced to choose sides in the conflict between the Percys and the Crown, and they ultimately sided with the Crown.

Despite their loyalty to the Crown, the Pattons suffered a significant setback when they were implicated in a plot to overthrow King Henry IV in 1403. Several members of the family were executed for their involvement in the plot, and the Patton family lost much of its wealth and power.

In the centuries that followed, the Patton family slowly rebuilt its fortunes. They continued to serve as soldiers and knights, and some members of the family even became prominent politicians and merchants. By the end of the 15th century, the Patton family had regained much of its former status and wealth.

Throughout their long and storied history, the Patton family remained fiercely loyal to the Crown and played a significant role in the history of England. From their roots as Norman knights to their position as prominent landowners and politicians, the Pattons left an indelible mark on English history.
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A mesmerising mob of kangaroos were captured bouncing through shallow waters at Lake Cootharaba in Noosa. 🌅🦘

📸: Suzanne Mcfadden

#9News | WATCH LIVE 6pm
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I just had the Ai GPT write a Patton Family song. Now I just need to get someone to put it to music for me. Hopefully with a Viking / Celtic feeling.

Verse 1:
Patton family, Vikings of old
Conquered lands, stories to be told
From Normandy they set sail
To England's shores, they would prevail

Chorus:
Patton family, strong and true
Their legacy, we carry through
From Scotland's shores to Australia's land
Pioneers, they took a stand

Verse 2:
In Scotland they lived for over four hundred years
Their tales of valor, brought many to tears
But the call of adventure, it burned in their hearts
To a new land, they would depart

Chorus:
Patton family, strong and true
Their legacy, we carry through
From Scotland's shores to Australia's land
Pioneers, they took a stand

Verse 3:
To Australia and America they went
Their bravery and courage, it was evident
Pioneers, they paved the way
For generations to come, to live and play

Chorus:
Patton family, strong and true
Their legacy, we carry through
From Scotland's shores to Australia's land
Pioneers, they took a stand

Outro:
The Patton family, a tale of might
Their spirit lives on, a guiding light
Through centuries of change, they stood tall
Their legacy, forever to stand, forever to be hallowed.
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Bloody Hoon 😜😜😜 ... See MoreSee Less
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VIDEO UPDATE

Bonsai The Patton Family Oak Tree acorns.
The Patton Family Oak Tree was planted circa 1886 by my Great-Great Grandmother Caroline Mary Alice Scott Patton at Shaldon Cottage in Wallan East.
The Tree still stands on a property called Oakdale between Wallan East & Upper Plenty.
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Yummo….. NOT !!!Earthworms are 82% protein, rich in Omega 3, and pair well with cumin and curry. They reportedly taste like bacon. ... See MoreSee Less
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My research is starting to expose a number of Patton Family lines in the U.S.A where the Male Y DNA is absent from male descendants due to the Patton Family name being passed on maternally rather than paternally. ... See MoreSee Less
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I got pulled over on the M6 for going 15 Kph over the speed limit. 🚓

As the Garda started walking up to my car, i rolled my windows down ..... 🚙

My adorable and apparently INCREDIBLY smart 4 yr old niece , started screaming from the backseat:

“It’s coming out!!!!!” 😱😱😱😱😱😱
“I can’t hold it any longer!!!!!”😳😳😳😳
“It’s almost here!!!!!!!!!!!”

Now the Garda is HEARING her scream this....
and he leans in the window and asks her “What’s going on here???”

She looks him 💀 DEAD IN THE FACE 💀

And says “I’ve got poop coming outta my butt!!”🤦🏻‍♀️🤦🏻‍♀️🤦🏻‍♀️🤦🏻‍♀️🤦🏻‍♀️🤦🏻‍♀️🤦🏻‍♀️

He started laughing 😂😂😂😂
I looked like I was about to cry 😭😭😭😭😭

He asked how far I had to go, which was about 2 Km home. He told me to drive safe and get miss thang home to do her business. He could NOT stop laughing😂😂😂

As soon as we pulled away I asked “What the hell was that about???”😳😳😳😳😳😳

This kid,smirked and said “I saw it on YouTube but I didn’t think it would work”🤷🏼‍♀️🤷🏼‍♀️🤷🏼‍♀️🤷🏼‍♀️

I said “So...... You're not pooping 💩?”
She said nope and you're not in trouble either.

OMG 👀👀👀
This kid is my hero 🦸‍♀️
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Halloween isn’t just an American holiday it’s a Scottish & Irish tradition.

One theory holds that many Halloween traditions were influenced by Celtic harvest festivals, particularly the Gaelic festival Samhain, which are believed to have pagan roots.
Some go further and suggest that Samhain may have been Christianized as All Hallow's Day, along with its eve, by the early Church.
Other academics believe Halloween began solely as a Christian holiday, being the vigil of All Hallow's Day.
Celebrated in Ireland and Scotland for centuries, Irish and Scottish immigrants took many Halloween customs to North America in the 19th century, and then through American influence Halloween had spread to other countries by the late 20th and early 21st century.
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Here's an interesting tidbit that I picked up in my research today.
We had a mass migration of Patton's from Mississippi to Texas in 1882, ten families in fact.

In 1887 Harry James Rogers married Mary Lynn Patton (1859-1939, 1868-1941) in Bell County, and they settled for life at the Old Rock House Place in Plum Creek near Levita.

Here they operated their commercial subsistence farm and raised eight children, another having died in infancy.

In 1877 the Isaac Rogers family migrated by train from Panola County, Mississippi except that Harry and two brothers followed by wagon-train with household goods and farming equipment.

The Pattons came there in 1882 with a colony of ten families, all from Mississippi.
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An update on the “children” of the oak tree planted by my great great grandmother Caroline Mary Alice Scott Patton in 1886 at Wallan East ... See MoreSee Less
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Any family members take a hiking holiday in the UK in 2005?
🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣A funny and true story about the Queen:
Around 2005, the Queen and her Personal Protection Officer, Dick Griffin, were walking alone one afternoon in the hills near the Scottish royal castle, Balmoral.
Two tourists approached them, and engaged in conversation. Griffin recalls:
"There were two hikers coming towards us, and the Queen would always stop and say hello.
"They were two Americans on a walking holiday.
"It was clear from the moment we stopped that they hadn't recognised the Queen, which was fine.
"The American gentleman was telling the Queen where they came from, where they were going next, and where they'd been in Britain.
"I could see it coming, and sure enough, he said to Her Majesty: 'And where do you live?'
"She replied: 'Well I live in London, but I've got a holiday home just the other side of the hills.'
"He said: 'How long have you been coming up here?'
"She replied: 'I've been coming up here ever since I was a little girl, so over 80 years.'
"You could see the cogs whirring, so he said: 'Well, if you've been coming up here for over 80 years, you must have met the Queen.'
"Quick as a flash, she said: 'I haven't, but Dick here meets her regularly.'
The hiker then asked Griffin what the monarch was like in person.
"Because I was with her a long time, and I knew I could pull her leg, I said: 'Oh, she can be very cantankerous at times, but she's got a lovely sense of humour.'
"The next thing I knew, this guy comes round, puts his arm around my shoulder, and before I could see what was happening, he gets his camera, GIVES IT TO THE QUEEN, and says: 'Can you take a picture of the two of us?'
"Then we swapped places, and I TOOK A PICTURE OF THEM WITH THE QUEEN.
"And we never let on, and we waved goodbye.
"Afterwards, Her Majesty said to me: 'I'd love to be a fly on the wall when he shows those photographs to his friends in America, and hopefully someone tells him who I am'."
RIP, Your Majesty ❤️
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HELP NEEDED !!!

Attached is a list of "unattached" Patton's that I have been unable to categorically (90%+ surety) attach to the Patton Family Tree. I know that they belong, but I'm not sure where.

Someone out there has the answer.

1 20949 Clyde E. PATTON M Nora E. PLOUGH

2 17868 DAVID PATON ??? M

3 17922 David PATON M Newburgh Cemetery, Newburgh,
Fife, Scotland
Elizabeth ROBERTSON

4 501345 David PATON of
Aberdeenshire, Scotland M
1500 Elizabeth "Bessie" RYMOUR

5 17870 David PATON M 1791, Ayr, South Ayrshire,
Scotland
Goulburn Old Cemetery, Goulburn,
New South Wales, Australia
Margaret MOORE

6 20913 Emma PATTON F 1859 George F. RIDER

7 20896 Felix PATTON M 1854 Greenlawn Cemetery, Nelsonville,
Athens County, Ohio, USA
Laura Ellen LINN

8 501335 George PATTON M 1570, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
PATTON
Margaret WYSCHART

9 20493 Harry PATTON M 1 Jul 1930, Clay County, Indiana,
USA
Benton Cemetery, Benton,
Marshall County, Kentucky, USA
Nathan
PATTON
Mae DUNCAN Sara Sue SWINFORD

10 17924 James PATON M 1757 South Leith Churchyard, Leith,
Edinburgh, Scotland

11 20915 James PATTON M June BEATTY

12 17942 James PATTON Sherriff-
Clerk of Perthshire M

13 501299 John PATON of
Dunfermline, Fife,
Scotland M

1515 UNLINKED
LINES
PATTON
Unknown

14 501009 John PATON of Muckart,
Perthshire, Scotland M
1525, Muckart, Perthshire,
Scotland
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Well this is what my Y-DNA test is telling me so far.
We need more male Patton / Patten / Paton (& other spelling variations) to join in and get their Y-DNA done.
I’ll be upgrading to the Big-Y with FamilyDNA over the coming months I think.

The R-M269 Story
Haplogroup R-M269 represents a man who is estimated to have been born around 6,400 years ago, plus or minus 900 years.

That corresponds to about 4350 BCE with a 95% probability he was born between 5262 and 3566 BCE.

R-M269's paternal line was formed when it branched off from R-P297 and the rest of mankind about 14,000 years ago, plus or minus 2,350 years.

He is the most recent common ancestor of at least 2 lineages known as R-L23 and R-PF7562.

There are 83,441 DNA test-confirmed descendants, and they have specified that their direct paternal origins are from Ireland, England, Scotland, and 139 other countries.

As more people test, the history of this genetic lineage might be further refined.
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Wow, what a week it has been.
I’ve been able to identify some Patton family connections to some notable Americans and made contact with a distant Patton cousins in Florida in the USA and I’m currently helping them with his family tree.

And then yesterday, to top it off, I received a message from a cousin Claire on my paternal grandmother‘s side of the family, the great great granddaughter of my great great great grandmother Marion (Mary Ann), how’s that.

Marion married twice and I descend from her through her second marriage to Frederick Hess
Claire from the first marriage.

Claire McCormick has kindly given me this Photo of my great great grandfather, Thomas Lennox and his older brother John. I only ever met pop Lennox once.
I have a bit of an affinity with Pop Lennox, he died on 27 June 1972, the day of my 10th birthday.

Thank you very much Claire.
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My Half-4th Cousin (7 x Removed) Elizabeth "Betsy" Patton was the wife of American Frontiersman and Legend Davy Crocket.
Read more about Davy & Betsy here.........
www.garypatton.net/patton_family/D19.htm#c17422
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I was thinking about NOT having a family reunion in 2023 on Saturday 28 January. To mark the 177th anniversary of our Patton family in Australia.
I think I might just go and sit in the Fitzroy Gardens and have a picnic just to celebrate, and if anyone just happens to show up with a picnic basket and a couple of chairs that would be great.
Do you think the Fitzroy Gardens are a good location or has anyone else got any other suggestions as to where I could go?
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How did our Patton Family get to Scotland?

In the case of my Family Line, Gratian Thomas Patton (1563 - 1603) moved his young family from England to Scotland between 1578 and 1590 where his son Rev. William Patton was born in 1590 in Ferrochie, Fifeshire, Scotland.

My Patton Family Line was to live in Scotland and later in the Orkney Islands for over 255 years at which time William Patton purportedly ran away to sea and arrived in Hobart before making his way to Port Phillip (Melbourne, Victoria, Australia) on the 27th January 1846
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OK. I'm on a mission.
Whilst over the years I've been able to add to our family history I've still to find the descendants of William's brother's and sisters, Uncles and Aunts.
This is what I have so far.

Brother's and Sisters
All born Kirkwall & St.Ola, Orkney Islands

Matilda Russell Patton (1826 - 1898) - Died in St.George, Edinburgh, Scotland - No other details

Anne Patton (1827 - 1864) - Died in Albert Street, Kirkwall - Married Hector McClean on 17 Jan 1850 in Drumglass, Tyrone, Ireland.

William Patton (1828 - 1909) - Emigrated to Australia, Our Australian Ancestor.

Robert Russel Paton (1830 - ) - I think I've tracked him to a marriage to Hannah Cairncross Johnston and a son Ebenezer Johnston Paton, both Hannah and Ebenezer emigrated to Australia (Tasmania) but I'd like to get DNA confirmation of that.

John Dunn Patton (1831 - 1914), we know that his grandson Charles Corsie Patton emigrated to Australia and his contribution to my family research through Doug Hutchinson is greatly valued. I would love to find other descendants.

James Douglas Patton (1832 - 1841) - Died at a young age.

Elizabeth Jane Patton (1833 - 1841) - Died at a young age.

Russell Patton (1835 - 1876) - Married Betsey Gillies in 1859 and he died at Bathurst River, Gambia. Supposedly leaving a child born circa 1860. No further details are known about this child or what happened to Betsey.

Jane Isabel Patton (1837 - ) - Married James Graham in 1871. Nothing is known of her descendants.

Charles Ninian Patton (1838 - 1840) - It is believed that Charles died at a young age.

May Ellinor Patton (1839 - 1871) - No further details are known.

Charles Purves Patton (1840 - ) - No further details are known about Charles or his descendants.

Ninian Purves Patton (1840 - 1870) - No further details are know about Ninian's descendants.

Elizabeth Jane Patton (1842 - ) - No further details are known about Elizabeth or her descendants.

Eleanor Patton (1843 - 1884) - Married Robert Paton in 1871. I have information regarding her descendants but would love to obtain DNA confirmation of the information that I have.

I would love to find out more about William's (1828 - 1909 Australia) brothers and sisters and our cousins.
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Meet my Uncle William.
William is my 26th great-great Uncle.
William was in the military and he had a pretty good victory at a place called Hastings in 1066.
His Dad, Robert I, Duke of Normandy is my 28th great grandfather.
Meet William The Conqueror.
I descend through his sister Adelaide of Normandy, Countess of Aumale.
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I've just today confirmed my Viking Lineage, I wondered why Scandinavia was appearing in my DNA results
I am the 32nd great-grandson of Rollo "The Viking"
Rollo (Norman: Rou, Rolloun; Old Norse: Hrólfr; French: Rollon; died between 928 and 933) was a Viking who became the first ruler of Normandy, today a region in northern France.

Gary Ian PATTON is the 32nd great-grandson of Rollo "The Viking" Count of Rouen

Common Ancestor

* Rollo "The Viking" Count of Rouen
(Cir 840 - Cir 930)
* Poppa of Bayeux
(Cir 880 - )
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* William LONGSWORD Count of Rouen
(Cir 893 - 17 Dec 942)
Sprota
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* Richard I Count of Rouen
(28 Aug 932 - 20 Nov 996)
Gunnor
(950 - 1031)
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* Richard II "Richard The Good" Duke of Normandy
( - 28 Aug 1026)
Judith of Brittany
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* Robert I "Robert The Magnificent" Duke of Normandy
(22 Jun 1000 - 3 Jul 1035)
Herleva
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Lambert II Count of Lens
(1030 - 1054)
* Adelaide of Normandy Countess of Aumale
(Cir 1030 - Bef 1090)
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Waltheof Anglo-Saxon Earl of Huntingdon
( - 31 May 1076)
* Judith Of Lens
(1054 - After 1086)
Married 1070
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Dauid "David I" MAC MAIL CHOLUIM King of Scotland
(1084 - 24 May 1153)
* Maud "Matilda" 2nd Countess of Huntingdon
Married 1113
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* Eanric "Henry" MAC DABID Earl of Huntingdon & Northumberland
( - 12 Jun 1152)
Ada DE WARENNE
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* David DE BRUS 8th Earl of Huntingdon
Matilda DE KEVILLOC
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* Robert DE BRUS IV Lord of Annandale
Isobel of Huntingdon
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* Robert DE BRUS V Lord of Annandale
(1215 - 1295)
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* Robert DE BRUS VI Lord of Annandale
Marjorie MAC DHONNCHAD 3rd Countess of Carrick
(Cir 1253 - Cir 1292)
Married 1271
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* King Robert I Robert 'The Bruce' DE BRUS VIII Earl Of Carrick
"Jure Uxoris" King of Scotland
(11 Jul 1274 - 7 Jun 1329)
Isabella OF MAR
(Cir 1277 - 12 Dec 1296)
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Walter STEWART 6th High Steward Of Scotland
* Marjorie BRUCE Princess of Scotland
(1296 - 1316)
Married 2 Mar 1315
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* King Robert II, Robert STEWART King Of Scotland
(2 Mar 1316 - 1390)
Elizabeth MUIR
Married 22 Nov 1347
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Sir William DOUGLAS Of Nithsdale
* Egidia (Jill) STEWART
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Henry ST. CLAIR 2nd Earl Of Orkney
(1362 - 1 Feb 1420)
* Egidia DOUGLAS Countess Of Orkney
( - After 1420)
Married 1407
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* William SINCLAIR 1st Sinclair Earl Of Caithness - 3rd Earl Of
Orkney
(1408 - 1482)
Marjory SUTHERLAND
(1436 - 1480)
Married Bef 15 Nov 1456
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* William SINCLAIR 2nd Earl Of Caithness
(1459 - 9 Sep 1513)
Mary KEITH
(1461 - )
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* Alexander SINCLAIR Of Dunbeath And Stemster
(Bef 1486 - Bef 1541)
Elizabeth INNES
(After 1493 - Bef 1557)
Married Abt 1522
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* Thomas SINCLAIR
(1540 - 1600)
Ann WHITE
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* JAMES SINCLAIR of Newclett and Estaquoy
(1570 - 3 Apr 1627)
Christianne SPENCE
(Abt 1570 - 1627)
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* Alexander SINCLAIR
(1620 - Aug 1689)
Janet SCLATER
(1620 - 1673)
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* MAGNUS SINCLAIR
(5 Oct 1654 - 1715)
Elizabeth MASSONE
(8 Feb 1666 - 1743)
Married 6 Feb 1690
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* James SINCLAIR
(20 Feb 1709 - 1749)
Anne GARRIOCH
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* John SINCLAIR
(1 Jan 1740 - 1 Jan 1794)
Barbara MAXWELL
(1739 - )
Married 10 Dec 1763
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William PATTON
(8 May 1760 - )
* Annie SINCLAIR
(22 Oct 1770 - )
Married 16 Jan 1790
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* Robert PATTON Esq; Writer to the Signet
(29 Aug 1797 - 6 Jun 1869)
Matilda RUSSELL
(12 Oct 1802 - 27 Jul 1889)
Married 6 Feb 1825
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* William PATTON Emigrated to Australia
(22 Sep 1828 - 17 Dec 1909)
Charlotte STAFFORD
(8 Jun 1828 - 10 Apr 1917)
Married 20 Dec 1853
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* Charles Douglas PATTON
(27 Dec 1859 - 17 Jul 1922)
Caroline Mary Alice SCOTT
(1858 - 27 May 1944)
Married 1880
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* Douglas William Arthur PATTON
(25 May 1884 - 8 Dec 1969)
Ina Moorabbee COCKS
(1888 - 14 Nov 1938)
Married 8 Feb 1908
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* Ernest Alfred "Ernie" PATTON
(17 Feb 1918 - 7 Mar 2009)
Mavis Maude LENNOX
(26 Aug 1917 - 15 Sep 1988)
Married 15 Feb 1936
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* Ian Ernest PATTON
(30 May 1940 - 21 Jan 2013)
Kaye HARRISON
(1 Nov 1944 - 3 May 2012)
Married 25 Nov 1961
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* Gary Ian PATTON
(27 Jun 1962 - )
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Where the hell is Alba?

Did you know that Alba (Scottish Gaelic: [ˈal̪ˠapə])) is the Scottish Gaelic name for Scotland. It is also, in English language historiography, used to refer to the polity of Picts and Scots united in the ninth century as the Kingdom of Alba, until it developed into the Kingdom of Scotland of the late Middle Ages following the absorption of Strathclyde and English-speaking Lothian in the 12th century. It is cognate with the Irish term Alba (gen. Alban, dat. Albain) and the Manx term Nalbin, the two other Goidelic Insular Celtic languages, as well as contemporary words used in Cornish (Alban) and Welsh (Yr Alban), both of which are Brythonic Insular Celtic languages. The third surviving Brythonic language, Breton, instead uses Bro-Skos, meaning 'country of the Scots'. In the past these terms were names for Great Britain as a whole, related to the Brythonic name Albion.

The development of Scotland was due in part to King Edmund I (House of Wessex, England), my 31st great-grandfather ceding the British Kingdom of Strathclyde to my other 31st great-grandfather, Malcolm I King of Scotland (31st great-grandfather) in 945 A.D.

The British kingdom of Strathclyde may also have sided with the Vikings as Edmund ravaged it in 945 and then ceded it to Malcolm I of Scotland
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APOLOGIES.
I've experienced a glitch with my website.
I'm hoping to be back up and running in the next hour.
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Bonsai The Patton Family Oak Tree acorns.
The Patton Family Oak Tree was planted circa 1886 by my Great-Great Grandmother Caroline Mary Alice Scott Patton at Shaldon Cottage in Wallan East.
The Tree still stands on a property called Oakdale between Wallan East & Upper Plenty.
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Bonsai The Patton Family Oak Tree acorns.
The Patton Family Oak Tree was planted circa 1886 by my Great-Great Grandmother Caroline Mary Alice Scott Patton at Shaldon Cottage in Wallan East.
The Tree still stands on a property called Oakdale between Wallan East & Upper Plenty.
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Due to scheduled website maintenance my website will not be able to be accessed on the following date.

Maintenance Window: Friday 3rd June, 2022 22:30 - 00:30 AEDT
Expected Outage/Downtime: 90 Minutes

Apologies for any inconvenience
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Obviously too much time on my hands 😛 😛 😛 ... See MoreSee Less
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What a great day it was here in Australia yesterday for ANZAC Day.
It was great to see so many Aussies unite in the spirit of ANZAC and share so many memories of those who helped make this country what it is today.
LEST WE FORGET
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Maurice Richard "Mod" Harrison WWI Military Medal for Gallantry
LEST WE FORGET.
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On this ANZAC Day 2022, let us also take time to reflect on the Service and Sacrifice of those family members who are serving and ex-serving Members of the Victorian Police Force.

(If I have missed someone please send me a photo of yourself or your relative in uniform, I'd love to be able to include you / them, thank you for your service}
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LEST WE FORGET.
ANZAC DAY 25 April 2022
Our Service Women.

If you know of any other girls who served please let me know.
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LEST WE FORGET.
ANZAC DAY 25 April 2022
Our Harrison Family Servicemen.
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LEST WE FORGET.
ANZAC DAY 25 April 2022
Our Patton Family Servicemen.
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Just had a great morning having a cuppa with my long lost 2nd Cousin (Once Removed) Lynette Bowtell (née Pointer) and her daughter Pam Bowtell (3rd Cousin) who, I have recently discovered, only live about 3kms from my home (Who knew 😜).
Lynette is the Granddaughter of Alfred Theodore Patton & Emma Dawson through Gwendoline Millicent Patton.
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garypatton6267.personal.ai
AI
84%
04:01 PM
William Patton was born in Kirkwall & St Ola, Orkney Islands, Scotland, and was christened on the 28 Sep 1828. William ran away from home at a young age, flying to America aboard a ship as a cabin boy and then to the southern oceans, according to anecdotal family research.
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My Ai (Artificial Intelligence) is now starting to compile some of its own information about the family. Not 100% yet but this is a great 1st effort for a Facebook Post.

Nelson was shot and killed during his final victory at the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805. Victory came under fire from the 74-gun Redoutable, lying off the Bucentaure's stern, and the 130-gun Santísima Trinidad. As sharpshooters from the enemy ships fired onto Victory's deck from their rigging, Nelson told him to take his pick. Victory's wheel was shot away, and another cannonball cut down eight marines. Nelson's secretary, John Scott, was nearly cut in two by a cannonball. Nelson then moved Victory across the stern of the 80-gun French flagship Bucent aure.
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To all my Family & Friends around the World I hope that you have a wonderful Easter. ... See MoreSee Less
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The Patton Family Oak Tree in Wallan East / Upper Plenty.

Thank you to Christine Ogilvie for this great photo.

The OAK TREE was planted by my Great Great Grandmother, Caroline Mary Alice Patton (née SCOTT) circa 1886.
Marian Patton (Caroline’s daughter) refers to the Oak Tree in her poem THE OLD HOME.
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IMPORTANT UPDATE TO THIS POST.

BREAKING NEWS!!!

Shaldon Cottage

Thanks to the concerted efforts of cousin Dorothy Theuma along with Richard Cooper & Christine Ogilvie from the Wallan Historical Group we have finally identified the original location of the home of Charles Douglas Patton & Caroline Mary Alice Scott.

The original home was dismantled and part of it was moved into Station Street, Wallan East which became the home of Marion “May” Patton and later in life her brother Alfred Theodore Patton Snr.

It is the ORIGINAL home called Shaldon Cottage that appears on the Christmas Card that May sent to family members in 1953.
Christine alerted me to the fact some time ago that there was a “Patton Oak Tree” of which she had a sapling.

This Oak Tree still lives on the property of the new owners who built a house on the site of the original homestead.

Several years ago I took my Uncle Rob & Aunty Ruth Patton for a drive to try and locate it and he believed that it was on the left as you headed towards Upper Plenty from the Kilmore-Epping Road. He was right, it was (see map).

This is very exciting and I can’t stress enough my gratitude to everyone who assisted in this.

The OAK TREE was planted by my Great Great Grandmother, Caroline Mary Alice Patton (née SCOTT) circa 1886.
Marian Patton (Caroline’s daughter) refers to the Oak Tree in her poem THE OLD HOME.
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Test Post for new Family History Ai Capabilities ... See MoreSee Less
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Your AI videoClick to watch the AI video "Your AI video" generated with Synthesia STUDIO. ... See MoreSee Less
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It’s days like today that I’m thrilled to have had an interest in searching the Family History ❤️ ... See MoreSee Less
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It doesn’t matter how long ago, family is always family ❤️❤️❤️ ... See MoreSee Less
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Stay safe everyone 😜 ... See MoreSee Less
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Happy Halloween

Did you know that Halloween originated in Scotland?

From Trove "Weekly Times, 14 November 1896, Page 12". Article identifier
nla.gov.au/nla.news-article221122848
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OK Patton’s around the world.
Let’s see if we can will him home.
😜🙏😜🙏😜🙏😜🙏😜
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