LONGWOOD, VICTORIA 3665

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Another link to Longwood through his Grandparents Doug & Molly Patton who lived in Hurley Street for many years. Congratulations Shane. ... See MoreSee Less

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A huge thank you to Vicki for sharing this with us.
Another Memory of Longwood to remember.
According to my Dad, Ian Patton, The rabbit factory was located at the top of Hurley Street up past the school,I can’t remember exactly how much they used to get, something like 1 Bob a pair.
As a kid I used to walk up the laneway past the cactus’ and wonder what used to be there.
Anyone else got memories of The Rabbit Factory to share?
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9 months ago

tany masina, ... See MoreSee Less

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10 months ago

Longwood Victoria 3665

Who remembers fishing for what we used to call minnows “brook trout” from the bridge at “The Sandy”?!?
Pan fried in butter 😋
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CALLING ALL FORMER MIEPOLL CRICKET CLUB PLAYERS:

REUNION Sat Oct 26 Miepoll Hall 3pm. - 6pm.

This article comes courtesy of John Gilbert and this morning's Euroa Gazette.
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Only down the “3 Mile” and 7 miles down the Hume 😜👍WE ARE HIRING
If you love our town and want to work locally we would love to love to hear from you.
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Last call for May order ... See MoreSee Less

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❤️❤️❤️❤️SAVE THE DATE💙💙💙💙 ... See MoreSee Less

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Well this takes me back 👍
It can also take the Club forward if you have a business and are able to sponsor the Redlegs into the 2019 season 👍

Edited - Thanks to Gordon Grant for the following. This was the 1970 Team Photo

Bill Elliott Trainer, Jim (Jimmy)Grant Goal Umpire, Wal (Alfie) Patton, Roy Robinson, Robert (Robbie) Houston, Sam (Sammy) Houston, John Bradley, Ken Kelly, Harry Crick, Trout boundary umpire, Doug (Dougie) Patton. John (Doods) Morrison, Richard (Dick) Carracher, Max (Cracker) Withers, Keith (Keithy) Patton, Robert (Robbie) Patton, Mick Hore, Chris Canty, Doug Crick, Gordon Grant, Brian (Frosty)Miller, Neville Trewan coach, Robert Ewing, Graeme Seach, Gary Gibb,
Mascotts Rodney Elliott , Gary Elliiot ,Andrew Grant,
l'm pretty sure this is correct
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The Ol’ Pub looks FANTASTIC ... See MoreSee Less

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Congratulations Brian Morrison ... See MoreSee Less

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Are you looking to promote your business or contribute as an individual to your community?
We are looking for Sponsors and Donors to help out with our Festival and would love to work with you. Let us know if you are interested and we will be in touch.
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The wait is over! Tickets for the 2019 Longwood Beer, Wine & Cider Festival go on sale TOMORROW Dec 11 @ 8am. Perfect Christmas presents or just get in early to secure a ticket at the pre-sale price. www.longwoodfortheloveofale.com.au ... See MoreSee Less

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On this day in Australian military history - 23rd November, 1901 - Lieutenant Leslie Maygar, 5th Victorian Mounted Rifles, Victoria Cross action at Geelhoutboom, Natal.

Maygar was the sixth and last Australian to be awarded the Victoria Cross during the Boer War.

Leslie Cecil Maygar (1868-1917), soldier and grazier, was born on 27 May 1868 at Dean station, Kilmore, Victoria, seventh child of Edwin Willis Maygar, grazier, and his wife Helen, née Grimshaw, both from Bristol, England.On this day in Australian military history - 23rd November, 1901 - Lieutenant Leslie Maygar, 5th Victorian Mounted Rifles, Victoria Cross action at Geelhoutboom, Natal.

Maygar was the sixth and last Australian to be awarded the Victoria Cross during the Boer War.

Leslie Cecil Maygar (1868-1917), soldier and grazier, was born on 27 May 1868 at Dean station, Kilmore, Victoria, seventh child of Edwin Willis Maygar, grazier, and his wife Helen, née Grimshaw, both from Bristol, England. He was named Edgar Leslie Cecil Willis Walker Maygar. His father's family were originally political refugees from Hungary. Leslie was educated at Alexandra and Kilmore State schools and privately. He was nearly 6 ft (183 cm), and had brown hair and later a Kitchener moustache. He, his father and three brothers owned Strathearn station, Euroa. A very fine horseman, Maygar enlisted in the Victorian Mounted Rifles in March 1891.

At the start of the South African War he was not accepted among the first volunteers, owing to a decayed tooth, but went with the 5th (Mounted Rifles) Contingent, arriving in Cape Town in March 1901. For twelve months the contingent was constantly in action, north of Middelburg, East Transvaal, then at Rhenoster Kop, Klippan, Kornfontein and Drivelfontein. It was transferred to Natal in August. At Geelhoutboom, on 23 November, Lieutenant Maygar was awarded the Victoria Cross for rescuing a fellow Victorian whose horse had been shot. With the enemy only 200 yards (183 m) away Maygar dismounted, put the man on his own horse, told him to gallop for the British lines, and ran back under heavy fire. His V.C. was presented by Lord Kitchener. Before returning home in March 1902 he was also mentioned in dispatches.

Resuming work as a grazier at Euroa, Maygar also served as a lieutenant in the 8th (later 16th) Light Horse, V.M.R., and was promoted captain in 1905. He enlisted in the Australian Imperial Force soon after World War I broke out, lowering his age by four years. On 20 August 1914 he was appointed a captain in the 4th Light Horse Regiment and sailed for Egypt in October. On Gallipoli, with the dismounted light horse, he was promoted major. On 17 October 1915 he was given temporary command of the 8th L.H.R., both rank of lieutenant-colonel and command being confirmed in December. During the evacuation of Gallipoli Maygar, left in command of forty men, was instructed to hold the trenches, at all costs, till 2.30 a.m. He wrote: 'I had my usual good luck to be given command of the last party to pull out of the trenches, the post of honour for the 3rd L.H. Brigade'.

Maygar led his regiment throughout its service in Sinai and Palestine until his death and was a much-admired leader. During the 2nd battle of Gaza, on 19 April 1917, the 8th was in a most exposed sector and suffering heavy casualties. Maygar rode about the battlefield all day on his grey charger and 'in every crisis stirred the spirit of his regiment by his example in the firing line'. Sir Henry Gullett records that Maygar was 'always very bold in his personal leadership' and writes of 19 April: 'It was a day when true leaders recognised that their men needed inspiration, and Maygar gave it in the finest manner'. He was awarded the Distinguished Service Order in June 1917, and was thrice mentioned in dispatches in 1916-18. When Brigadier General J. R. Royston was invalided home, Colonel Maygar acted as brigadier general in command of the 3rd Light Horse Brigade.

Late on the day of the battle of Beersheba, 31 October 1917, a German aeroplane, using bombs and machine-guns, hit Maygar whose arm was shattered. The grey bolted into the darkness and was found later by 8th Regiment troopers but Maygar was not with him. 'He was picked up during the night by other troops ... and, having lost too much blood, died the next day at Karm'. L. C. Maygar, 'Elsie' as he was affectionately known, was 'a true fighting commander'.
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A very interesting article re. Major Fred Tubb VC in the Herald Sun during the week, that followers of this page may find interesting.
Cheers
Mazzie
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I was just thinking. One Saturday night we should all rock up to the The White Hart Hotel Longwood for a beer (or two). Any takers? ... See MoreSee Less

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OK. These are a MUST HAVE !!! ... See MoreSee Less

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I believe that these can be purchased and payment made into the club’s bank account. See attached post.Tickets are in!!!!
Please speak to anyone of our great committee, players or supporters.
Thanks again to Ezytrail campers
🤞🏾🤞🏾🤞🏾🤞🏾🤞🏾🤞🏾
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I remember the morning that the Longwood Ganger Truck arrived at our home on the top of Hill Street earlier than normal and a knocking on the door woke us all up as they came to pick up Dad (Ian) and told him of the accident. Actually Bob, Red, Ian, Bazil and Rusty used to meet over in the Goods Yard near the trolley shed every morning, so even us kids knew that this was unusual.
Looking back on it I never heard Dad talk about it much.
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Lest We Forget
youtu.be/McCDWYgVyps
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Memories of Longwood ... See MoreSee Less

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THE LONGWOOD RAILWAY STATION

I used to love going down to the station. For many years Mr McKay won the prize for the best garden of any Railway Station in Victoria with the sprawling pigface along the inclining garden bed.
Being able to change and know where each of the “points” were located by pulling the huge levers that towered over me.
Learning how to catch the Flagstaff with one arm and to be able to transfer "my" flagstaff to the Train Driver handing out of the window as the "express" train roared through the Station.
Helping Grandad & Dad cart wool into the Goods Shed.
Learning to handle a keg at 10 years of age by rolling it on its edge and learning how to lower it gently into the cellar at the White Hart Hotel to ensure that the Customers were kept refreshed.
It’s a damn shame that the Victorian Government of the day allowed such an historic location to be destroyed.
Hopefully this page never allows it to be lost forever. :’-(

** A huge thanks to Bill Hotchkiss for the pics that he added in the comments section.
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Carn’ The Redlegs !!! ... See MoreSee Less

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3 years ago

Longwood Victoria 3665

Longwood Victoria 3665's cover photo ... See MoreSee Less

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Longwood House was the residence of Napoleon Bonaparte, during his exile on the island of Saint Helena, from 10 December 1815 until his death on 5 May 1821. It lies on a windswept plain some 6 km (3.7 mi) from Jamestown.

Longwood "was originally a farm belonging to the East India Company and was afterwards given as a country residence to the Deputy-Governor." It was converted for the use of Napoleon in 1815. The British government recognised its inadequacy as a home for the former Emperor and his entourage and, by the time of his death, had built a new house for him nearby, which he never occupied.

In February 1818, Governor Sir Hudson Lowe proposed to Lord Bathurst to move Napoleon to Rosemary Hall, a house that became available and was located in a more hospitable part of the island, sheltered from the winds and shaded, as Napoleon had preferred. But the revelations of General Gourgaud in London brought Lord Bathurst to the opinion that it was safer to keep Napoleon at Longwood, where an escape was harder to undertake. The building of the new house only began in October 1818, three years after Napoleon's arrival on the island.

Longwood, is named after Napoleon Bonaparte's home on St Helena. John Brook was a squatter here in 1844. At the time this area was also know as 'Winding Creek', Hugh Middlemiss commenced his ‘Salutation Inn’ on the Sydney road around this time, where the coaches branched off to the goldfields in the Mansfield/Jamieson area [Loretta].

The Salutation Inn was built by William Beaton, brother to Isabella Beaton. Both survivors of the burning of the barque India on their journey from England to Australia.

After the railway went through in 1874, the towns folk of Longwood gradually moved there and a settlement called Longwood Rail was established at the station.

In 1895 the settlement was surveyed and proclaimed as Longwood West. After the 1951 review, the name of the then Longwood was altered to Old Longwood and Longwood West was renamed Longwood.

An article from the Euroa Advertiser, Friday 1st October 1920 by a young William Thomson gives a fabulous insight into Longwood at the turn of the 20th century.
trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/65690646

LOCAL HISTORY COMPETITION LONGWOOD

The following history of Longwood was awarded third prize in the local history competition at the Euroa exhibition of school's work. The booklet was well arranged and illustrated by drawings. It will be found interesting reading:-

1. - EARLY SETTLEMENT

The early history of Longwood is surrounded with interest. It was originally a camping ground between Sydney and Port Phillip Bay. Probably the earliest camper was J. Crook, who came from Sydney about 1839; but "Tommy the Nut" also claimed to be one of the very first men to camp on what is now termed the Nine Mile Creek, which was the original name of Longwood. The spot was attractively situated at the foot of a steep range, with a clear gurgling stream (the Winding Creek); and plenty of grass. So it was that when the rush to the Ovens diggings broke out in the fifties, the Nine Mile Creek became more frequented than ever.
In fact, Old Longwood grew to be a well known centre in those early days, and the pioneers still surviving look back with sighing regret at the fine stirring days of the arrival of batches of travellers. Of course proper settlement followed this stop-and-on—again sort of progress, so we find a store and an inn arising. A proper line of coaches took up the running between Melbourne and the North East (Sydney) and Cobb and Co.'s name is remembered as the great carrying firm. Longwood was the branching centre of the traffic from Melbourne to Mansfield, Alexandra, Woods Point, etc. while the coach from the Seven Creeks (now Gooram and Euroa) also stopped the night. In fact Longwood district embraced what we now know as Creighton, Tarcombe, Molka, Locksley, and so on.

2. - INDUSTRIES AND PROGRESS
No particular industries sprang up as apart from the use of Longwood as a coaching centre, and this was to bear fatal fruit as soon as improved methods of locomotion came into vogue.

Bark stripping was active, and around in a big radius were sheep runs own by Ryan (now Killeen), Wangabaranda (Wheeler), whose name is perpetuated in Wheeler's Swamp, Tarcombe (Younghusband, who afterwards bought and named Killeen.

The inn and store at Longwood were built by Hugh Middlemiss about 1855 and it was called the Salutation Inn, being near the Winding Creek bridge and the toll gate. Middlemisses may claim to be the leading earliest residents, but in 1857 civilisation followed fast.

A post-office was opened as a repeating station under a Mr. Nunn, who also opened up the first absolutely authentic records as Registrar of Births and Deaths, in 1859.

Mails and coaches came from Melbourne along old Sydney road tri-weekly; and dashed down the Longwood hill with bugles blowing, to rouse "Billy the Tollman." Meanwhile Longwood was still an outpost.

The nearest medical aid was Seymour, and the spiritual needs of the inhabitants were not over-well attended to either.

Education was remembered, however. and about 1861 what we would term a common school (where the children paid) was opened by a Mr. Henderson in a room in Mr. Beecroft's house.
Later on this was transferred to Smith's empty house close by, and after a succession of teachers, including Messrs Stack and Watson.
Mr. Fisher took charge of the school children. He appears to have had personality, and remains the only notable teacher till 1875; when the late
Mr. H. Tubb arrived as a State school teacher. Perhaps Mr. Fisher's tragically sudden death helped to fix his memory in the annals of the hill- side hamlet. A police station was set up in 1857 at the rear of what then was the post-office and is now Capt. F Tubbs residence. The original lock up is still doing duty in New Longwood. Cobb & Co.'s coach depot was at the rear of Middlemiss's hotel.

The blacksmith was a necessity that came early on the scene, and Mr Kellock had his smithy opposite St Helens; and on the banks of the Winding Creek (a tributary of the Nine Mile Creek)

Mr Kellocks residence has seen many tenants, from Smiths to various professionals, and is still ; in fine order, and is occupied by Mrs W. Hamilton and family. Alas not many old buildings remain. Another store followed (Kiernan's) and Mr. Middlemiss built a palatial hotel— The Longwood Hotel. But he died in
his prime, in 1859, and after a succession of managers Mr. A. Hamilton who has bought the Salutation Inn in 1865, became the owner of the Longwood hotel. No trace of it exists; but a part became the present White Hart Hotel. Mrs Bunting's house etc., as if it were scattered to all the winds that blow. Along with the Middlemisses and Kellocks and others mentioned, pioneers of the days included Beecrofts, Macdonalds, Meades, Castrees (toll gate keepers), O'Briens and Poynes, and many of the representatives still live round the district.

It does seem incredible that Longwood was in 1857-1865 the hub of of the central North East, while Euroa was as nowhere almost.

An idea of Longwood as a rest house may be gauged when even in the late sixties as many as one hundred and sixty horses have been camped about. Yet for years it was as the Nine-Mile that Longwood prospered.

3. - ORIGIN OF NAME
The origin of the name is involved, but there is no doubt that the idea most prevalent about its connection with Napoleon and Longwood in St. Helena, is correct. The version given is that the name Longwood was adopted after the authorized survey of the township in the '60's, but the willows were there then.

The story goes that Dr. L. L. Smith (Smith's Almanac) was going through to the Ovens diggings, and he and Hugh Middlemiss (a friend of his) planted on the Winding Creek a couple of cuttings he had brought from the original tree at St. Helena while coming out from Europe. Howbeit, the name was universally adopted; and later on Mr. Tubb named his place St. Helena appropriately. (Does it not seem fate that, fifty years after, sons from this "St. Helena" should go and fight; and even die, for Napoleon's countrymen in France). The creeks are still the Nine-Mile (from the Seven Creeks) and the Winding Creek. The little cemetery on the edge of the Winding Creek, with its many forgotten dead, has seen the decay of the brightest hopes of Old Longwood and its glories.

4. - EDUCATIONAL PROGRESS
The proper school was built by the people in Mr. Fisher's time, and given to the State. It was at the back of Old Longwood. Its number was 367; but New Longwood's is 2707. The bell that then stirred up tardy scholars now calls to worship the Anglican folk in the township, but the building was sold. Its blocks remain along with the name of some streets such as Fitzroy Street.

5. RISE OF NEW LONGWOOD
But Longwood's day of fate was at hand in the shape of a railway line.
This did not pass through Longwood East, but took a course about two miles away, on the edge of the Goulburn plain. The construction there was easier and cheaper. It brought about, slowly and surely, a transfer of business to the station, and hence arose the present Longwood. The railway was opened in November 1872; and from that on a decline began, though the post-office was not transferred till 1879 and the school not even till 1885. Even then two schools were kept going for a while. The Police Station was shifted to Buddy's (i. e., where Puddy's house is now), and then Mr. Hall built the present station. Old Longwood had the doubtful honour of being passed through by the Kelly's in 1878. In fact, in 1869, Powell, the bushranger, was busy with the mail man from Longwood to Alexandra, just near Morton. Pan, the driver, had this experience of being stuck up, but escaped lightly.

6. - SETTLEMENT IN THE NEW TOWNSHIP
As in the old township, public convenience followed this railroad, and Maxfield's, from Kilmore set up a mill and store in 1873, and a part of it still stands (Mr. Corich's residence), but it is greatly transformed.
The traffic from Old Longwood to Molka and further out, made the new town grow, and so most of the old residents shifted down. Kiernans had a bark store where O'Connell Bros. are, and Hamilton built the White Hart Hotel. The toll gates opposite Tubb's and the check gates on the hill on the connecting road between

Old and New Longwood have dis- appeared, and Castrees is almost a forgotten name. Mr. Hill had become a police officer at the old town. Selectors became numerous round about, and saw-mills began operation, and for the next thirty years New Longwood was noted for its wood. The station was a centre for
traffic to Gobur and Yarek, etc, but Euroa and Violet Town had done with Longwood as a traffic point.
Coaches met the train, and you drove across the range to Ruffy, Gobur, and beyond.

7. PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS IN LONGWOOD
The Mechanics' Institute was built in 1883 out of the ruins of a burnt- out hotel opposite its site, and it has proved a great boon. All praise to the Maxfields, Grants, Robbins, Kiernans and the rest who erected what was a fine building for the town. In 1885 the State opened up a school in it till the new school (No. 2707) was finished. The old church of St. Andrew's at Longwood East was incorporated into the new St. Andrew's in the township in 1901. The old building had been a part of Middlemiss's hall, but it did good duty for fifty years as a place of worship. New Longwood had gradually improved itself, and when the streets were laid out pioneers of the new town had their names given to them.
The Monument Square is a good centre. It commemorates the volun- teers who served in the Boer War, and the V.C. gained by Lieut. L. C. Maygar (1899-1902). Equally distinguished was Longwood in the recent great war, when a second V.C. was gained by Major F. Tubb, The M.C. was gained by Capt. F. Tubb
and the late Capt. G. Maxfield, all natives of Old Longwood. As these lads dreampt of the bygone days in their own hamlet they little thought of the part they would play in history. At present Longwood is a neat township of mixed pursuits—wood, wool, rabbits, and dairy produce. The rabbit factory near the school had a brief career which was ended by fire 30 years ago. Somehow New Longwood does not seem as interesting as the Old Town, with its hills and streams, its tragedies and its thrills, as the coach bugle rang through the hills when the coach arrived from Melbourne and on its return. Yet the town is up-to-date. It has its water supply scheme, its telephone, and its motors.
Old Longwood is now the petty remnant of an English-looking village, and from Tubb's lookout one can picture all the past sixty or seventy years. Judging by the standard of progress even towns must go on or decay. Old Longwood's loss was New Longwood's gain.

WILLIAM THOMSON

I hope you enjoy this page, contribute, share your memories or learn more about this vibrant little town that many of us call, or have called out HOME.

Gary Patton (GG Nephew of William Beaton, resident of Longwood (1966 - 1979)

(The photos below are of Longwood House and if the Salutation Inn in Old Longwood)
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An article from the Euroa Advertiser, Friday 1st October 1920
trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/65690646

LOCAL HISTORY COMPETITION LONGWOOD

The following history of Longwood was awarded third prize in the local history competition at the Euroa exhibition of school's work. The booklet was well arranged and illustrated by drawings. It will be found interesting reading:-

1. - EARLY SETTLEMENT

The early history of Longwood is surrounded with interest. It was originally a camping ground between Sydney and Port Phillip Bay. Probably the earliest camper was J. Crook, who came from Sydney about 1839; but "Tommy the Nut" also claimed to be one of the very first men to camp on what is now termed the Nine Mile Creek, which was the original name of Longwood. The spot was attractively situated at the foot of a steep range, with a clear gurgling stream (the Winding Creek); and plenty of grass. So it was that when the rush to the Ovens diggings broke out in the fifties, the Nine Mile Creek became more frequented than ever.
In fact, Old Longwood grew to be a well known centre in those early days, and the pioneers still surviving look back with sighing regret at the fine stirring days of the arrival of batches of travellers. Of course proper settlement followed this stop-and-on—again sort of progress, so we find a store and an inn arising. A proper line of coaches took up the running between Melbourne and the North East (Sydney) and Cobb and Co.'s name is remembered as the great carrying firm. Longwood was the branching centre of the traffic from Melbourne to Mansfield, Alexandra, Woods Point, etc. while the coach from the Seven Creeks (now Gooram and Euroa) also stopped the night. In fact Longwood district embraced what we now know as Creighton, Tarcombe, Molka, Locksley, and so on.

2. - INDUSTRIES AND PROGRESS
No particular industries sprang up as apart from the use of Longwood as a coaching centre, and this was to bear fatal fruit as soon as improved methods of locomotion came into vogue.

Bark stripping was active, and around in a big radius were sheep runs own by Ryan (now Killeen), Wangabaranda (Wheeler), whose name is perpetuated in Wheeler's Swamp, Tarcombe (Younghusband, who afterwards bought and named Killeen.

The inn and store at Longwood were built by Hugh Middlemiss about 1855 and it was called the Salutation Inn, being near the Winding Creek bridge and the toll gate. Middlemisses may claim to be the leading earliest residents, but in 1857 civilisation followed fast.

A post-office was opened as a repeating station under a Mr. Nunn, who also opened up the first absolutely authentic records as Registrar of Births and Deaths, in 1859.

Mails and coaches came from Melbourne along old Sydney road tri-weekly; and dashed down the Longwood hill with bugles blowing, to rouse "Billy the Tollman." Meanwhile Longwood was still an outpost.

The nearest medical aid was Seymour, and the spiritual needs of the inhabitants were not over-well attended to either.

Education was remembered, however. and about 1861 what we would term a common school (where the children paid) was opened by a Mr. Henderson in a room in Mr. Beecroft's house.
Later on this was transferred to Smith's empty house close by, and after a succession of teachers, including Messrs Stack and Watson.
Mr. Fisher took charge of the school children. He appears to have had personality, and remains the only notable teacher till 1875; when the late
Mr. H. Tubb arrived as a State school teacher. Perhaps Mr. Fisher's tragically sudden death helped to fix his memory in the annals of the hill- side hamlet. A police station was set up in 1857 at the rear of what then was the post-office and is now Capt. F Tubbs residence. The original lock up is still doing duty in New Longwood. Cobb & Co.'s coach depot was at the rear of Middlemiss's hotel.

The blacksmith was a necessity that came early on the scene, and Mr Kellock had his smithy opposite St Helens; and on the banks of the Winding Creek (a tributary of the Nine Mile Creek)

Mr Kellocks residence has seen many tenants, from Smiths to various professionals, and is still ; in fine order, and is occupied by Mrs W. Hamilton and family. Alas not many old buildings remain. Another store followed (Kiernan's) and Mr. Middlemiss built a palatial hotel— The Longwood Hotel. But he died in
his prime, in 1859, and after a succession of managers Mr. A. Hamilton who has bought the Salutation Inn in 1865, became the owner of the Longwood hotel. No trace of it exists; but a part became the present White Hart Hotel. Mrs Bunting's house etc., as if it were scattered to all the winds that blow. Along with the Middlemisses and Kellocks and others mentioned, pioneers of the days included Beecrofts, Macdonalds, Meades, Castrees (toll gate keepers), O'Briens and Poynes, and many of the representatives still live round the district.

It does seem incredible that Longwood was in 1857-1865 the hub of of the central North East, while Euroa was as nowhere almost.

An idea of Longwood as a rest house may be gauged when even in the late sixties as many as one hundred and sixty horses have been camped about. Yet for years it was as the Nine-Mile that Longwood prospered.

3. - ORIGIN OF NAME
The origin of the name is involved, but there is no doubt that the idea most prevalent about its connection with Napoleon and Longwood in St. Helena, is correct. The version given is that the name Longwood was adopted after the authorized survey of the township in the '60's, but the willows were there then.

The story goes that Dr. L. L. Smith (Smith's Almanac) was going through to the Ovens diggings, and he and Hugh Middlemiss (a friend of his) planted on the Winding Creek a couple of cuttings he had brought from the original tree at St. Helena while coming out from Europe. Howbeit, the name was universally adopted; and later on Mr. Tubb named his place St. Helena appropriately. (Does it not seem fate that, fifty years after, sons from this "St. Helena" should go and fight; and even die, for Napoleon's countrymen in France). The creeks are still the Nine-Mile (from the Seven Creeks) and the Winding Creek. The little cemetery on the edge of the Winding Creek, with its many forgotten dead, has seen the decay of the brightest hopes of Old Longwood and its glories.

4. - EDUCATIONAL PROGRESS
The proper school was built by the people in Mr. Fisher's time, and given to the State. It was at the back of Old Longwood. Its number was 367; but New Longwood's is 2707. The bell that then stirred up tardy scholars now calls to worship the Anglican folk in the township, but the building was sold. Its blocks remain along with the name of some streets such as Fitzroy Street.

5. RISE OF NEW LONGWOOD
But Longwood's day of fate was at hand in the shape of a railway line.
This did not pass through Longwood East, but took a course about two miles away, on the edge of the Goulburn plain. The construction there was easier and cheaper. It brought about, slowly and surely, a transfer of business to the station, and hence arose the present Longwood. The railway was opened in November 1872; and from that on a decline began, though the post-office was not transferred till 1879 and the school not even till 1885. Even then two schools were kept going for a while. The Police Station was shifted to Buddy's (i. e., where Puddy's house is now), and then Mr. Hall built the present station. Old Longwood had the doubtful honour of being passed through by the Kelly's in 1878. In fact, in 1869, Powell, the bushranger, was busy with the mail man from Longwood to Alexandra, just near Morton. Pan, the driver, had this experience of being stuck up, but escaped lightly.

6. - SETTLEMENT IN THE NEW TOWNSHIP
As in the old township, public convenience followed this railroad, and Maxfield's, from Kilmore set up a mill and store in 1873, and a part of it still stands (Mr. Corich's residence), but it is greatly transformed.
The traffic from Old Longwood to Molka and further out, made the new town grow, and so most of the old residents shifted down. Kiernans had a bark store where O'Connell Bros. are, and Hamilton built the White Hart Hotel. The toll gates opposite Tubb's and the check gates on the hill on the connecting road between

Old and New Longwood have dis- appeared, and Castrees is almost a forgotten name. Mr. Hill had become a police officer at the old town. Selectors became numerous round about, and saw-mills began operation, and for the next thirty years New Longwood was noted for its wood. The station was a centre for
traffic to Gobur and Yarek, etc, but Euroa and Violet Town had done with Longwood as a traffic point.
Coaches met the train, and you drove across the range to Ruffy, Gobur, and beyond.

7. PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS IN LONGWOOD
The Mechanics' Institute was built in 1883 out of the ruins of a burnt- out hotel opposite its site, and it has proved a great boon. All praise to the Maxfields, Grants, Robbins, Kiernans and the rest who erected what was a fine building for the town. In 1885 the State opened up a school in it till the new school (No. 2707) was finished. The old church of St. Andrew's at Longwood East was incorporated into the new St. Andrew's in the township in 1901. The old building had been a part of Middlemiss's hall, but it did good duty for fifty years as a place of worship. New Longwood had gradually improved itself, and when the streets were laid out pioneers of the new town had their names given to them.
The Monument Square is a good centre. It commemorates the volun- teers who served in the Boer War, and the V.C. gained by Lieut. L. C. Maygar (1899-1902). Equally distinguished was Longwood in the recent great war, when a second V.C. was gained by Major F. Tubb, The M.C. was gained by Capt. F. Tubb
and the late Capt. G. Maxfield, all natives of Old Longwood. As these lads dreampt of the bygone days in their own hamlet they little thought of the part they would play in history. At present Longwood is a neat township of mixed pursuits—wood, wool, rabbits, and dairy produce. The rabbit factory near the school had a brief career which was ended by fire 30 years ago. Somehow New Longwood does not seem as interesting as the Old Town, with its hills and streams, its tragedies and its thrills, as the coach bugle rang through the hills when the coach arrived from Melbourne and on its return. Yet the town is up-to-date. It has its water supply scheme, its telephone, and its motors.
Old Longwood is now the petty remnant of an English-looking village, and from Tubb's lookout one can picture all the past sixty or seventy years. Judging by the standard of progress even towns must go on or decay. Old Longwood's loss was New Longwood's gain.

WILLIAM THOMSON
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Shared to the Lost Euroa page by Glenda Miller.
Who remembers the old Mechanics Institute? Many a dance and school play held here. It was so sad to see it go.Courtesy of one Glenda Miller.

Longwood postcard from early 1900's (we think).
Thankyou Glenda
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When you talk about the "Legends" of Longwood you can't forget the Breen family when they "snagged the lotto" back in 1977.

I found this front page of the Euroa Gazette dated Wednesday 5th March 1977 as I was going through some of my Mum's (Kaye Patton nee Harrison) paperwork.

Cheers
Gary
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Many a larrikin and many a story told enjoying a beer at our favourite watering hole and it's still going strong. Are you following "The Pub's" Facebook page?
White Hart Hotel Longwood
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Longwood Primary School 1979.

Does anyone know what year the Longwood State School 2707 changed to the Longwood Primary School?

Longwood Primary School
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Longwood State School 2707, Grades Prep 1 & 2 (The Little Room) in 1971

Longwood Primary School
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Thanks for posting this Greg. Hopefully everyone following this page will contribute as well.
Longwood State School 2707, Grades 3-6 (The Big Room) circa 1974.
Who do you know in this photo? Tag them.

Longwood Primary School
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3 years ago

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Carn the Redlegs.!!!
The Longwood Cheer Squad back in the late 70's (early 80's).
5 Elliott girls (Daughters of Bill Elliott) and Amber Hawkins.
Do you know the others?
Did you know that the Redlegs were also known as "The Bull Ants"?
Many thanks to Sue Long (nee Elliott) for passing this along to us.

Longwood Football Netball Club
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Longwood State School 2707, Grades 3,4,5 & 6 (The Big Room) in 1972

Longwood Primary School
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3 years ago

Longwood Victoria 3665

Longwood State School 2707, Grades Prep 1 & 2 (The Little Room) in 1969.

(I'm on the far left centre row. Tag as many people that you know in this)

Longwood Primary School
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3 years ago

Longwood Victoria 3665

Longwood State School 2707, Grades 3,4,5 & 6 (The Big Room) in 1971

(Tag yourself or someone you know in this photo. I'm bottom right and the only one with a tie I think. Thanks Mum 😂😂😂😂😂😂😳😳)

Longwood Primary School
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Euroa Victoria Cross & Avenue of Honour Soldiers's cover photo ... See MoreSee Less

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Today we honour and remember two of our most famous "Digger" sons who remain immortalised in the Longwood district by hills bearing their names and all those other "Sons of Longwood" would fought to protect this Great Nation Australia.
Please share any of your family members on this post so that we can also remember them ..... LEST WE FORGET 🇦🇺🇦🇺🇦🇺
anzacportal.dva.gov.au/history/great-war-memories/tubb’s-hill-and-maygar’s-hill-victoria
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On this day in 1885 "New" Longwood was proclaimed a town.
24th April 1885. 132 years ago.
Happy Birthday Longwood 🎉🎉🎉
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Merry Christmas 🎅🎅🎅
Who remembers when the kids of Longwood used to march around Longwood with candles singing Christmas Carols?
Merry Christmas and have a fantastic New Year 🎉🎉🎉
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Who remembers the Rabbit Factory at Longwood? Please share your recollections or stories 😉 ... See MoreSee Less

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Longwood was first located on the old Sydney to Melbourne Highway (in the paddocks at Fred Tubb's farm) serving as a staging post for the horse-drawn coaches. The town moved east by around 4 km when the railway was built and a station established at Longwood.

The Post Office opened on 1 July 1852 and the office named Longwood Railway Station opened in 1881.
Longwood was later renamed Longwood East and Longwood Railway Station was renamed to Longwood. The town and surrounding countryside was the scene of a devastating bushfire on 17 January 1965. 7 people died fleeing the flames in a car.
(Source - Wikipedia)
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4 years ago

Longwood Victoria 3665

Longwood Victoria 3665 ... See MoreSee Less

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A boy and his dog - Circa 1950 a young Ian Patton and his dog walking on the Pranjip Creek (Sandy Creek) Bridge. ... See MoreSee Less

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7 years ago

Longwood Victoria 3665

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A place for everyone associated with Longwood, Victoria, Australia 3665 to post their memories, Legends, stories of Larrikins & Lacquered Lithurgies Of Longwood. ... See MoreSee Less

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