Visit our Online Store

Anderson Family


picture

previous  Eighth Generation  Next



41. Jane REID (Isabella PATON31, William PATON28, Elizabeth ANDERSON24, Ninian19, Ninian14, Niniane2, Johne1) was born in 1829.

Events

RESIDENCE: in 1851, in Morpeth, Northumberland, England.

42. James REID (Isabella PATON31, William PATON28, Elizabeth ANDERSON24, Ninian19, Ninian14, Niniane2, Johne1) was born in 1831.

Events

RESIDENCE: in 1851, in Morpeth, Northumberland, England.

43. David REID (Isabella PATON31, William PATON28, Elizabeth ANDERSON24, Ninian19, Ninian14, Niniane2, Johne1) was born on 13 Jul 1832 in St.Cutherberts, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland, was christened on 12 Aug 1832 in Canongate, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland, and died on 6 Dec 1919 in Toowoomba Queenland Australia at age 87.

Events

1861: David was employed as, Joiner, in Glasgow, Lanarkshire, Scotland.

1861: David resided at 45 Eglinton Street,, Glasgow, Lanarkshire, Scotland.
David was boarding with Robert & Wilhelmina Brown at this address in 1861.

1881: David was employed as, Master Carpenter, in Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.

1881: David resided at 24 Sciennes Street,, St.Cuthbert's, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.

Emigrated: Departure on the ship "Closeburn", on 15 Jul 1890, in Glasgow, Lanarkshire, Scotland.

Immigrated: Brisbane, in 1891, in Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
CLOSEBURN

An iron barque built in 1881 by Russell & Co., Port Glasgow, as yard no. 38. Dimensions 201'0"×32'7"×19'5" and 924 GRT, 897 NRT. 1881 Launched at the shipyard of Russell & Co., Port Glasgow, for Thomas C. Guthrie, Glasgow. 1902 Sold to A/S Closeburn (Mathias Hansen), Kristiansand. 1921 December 10 Sold to Nils Fremberg and partners, Sölvesborg, for NOK 55.000 and was renamed Virgo. Assigned the official Swedish Reg. No. 6703 and signal KDMC. The new measurements were 59,62×9,95×5,95 meters and 960 GRT, 871 NRT and 1450 DWT. Captain Gustaf Alfred Johansson, Sölvesborg. 1928 February 4 Sold to Erik Nylund, Mariehamn, for SEK 28.500. Captain Anders Donner. 1928 Collided with the German steamer Marie Ferdinand at Öland on voyage from London to Mariehamn. The Virgo lost the jib boom and damaged the stem. 1928 December 5 Wrecked at the Skvatthällen outside Kobba Klintar, Åland.

1905: David resided at Grange Farm, Ringing Plain, Dalby, Queensland.

1913: David was employed as, Farmer - Grange Farm, in Ringing Plain, Dalby, Queensland.

1913: David resided at Grange Farm, Ringing Plain, Dalby, Queensland.

David married Janet "Jessie" HAMILTON on 3 Apr 1868 in Edinburgh Parish, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland. Janet was born on 18 Sep 1842 in Cannogate, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland and died on 21 Apr 1923 in Toowoomba, Queensland, Australia at age 80.

Events

RESIDENCE: 24 Sciennes Street,, in 1881, in St.Cuthbert's, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.

RESIDENCE: Grange Farm, in 1905, in Ringing Plain, Dalby, Queensland.

OCCUPATION: Farmer - Grange Farm, in 1913, in Ringing Plain, Dalby, Queensland.

RESIDENCE: Grange Farm, in 1913, in Ringing Plain, Dalby, Queensland.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 68 M    i. David REID was born on 17 Jan 1869 in St.Giles, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland, was christened on 20 Jan 1869 in St.Giles, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland, and died on 19 Jun 1877 in Newington, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland at age 8.

+ 69 M    ii. James Hamilton REID was born on 27 Feb 1870 in Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland and died on 15 Feb 1959 in Drayton, Queensland, Australia at age 88.

+ 70 M    iii. Peter REID was born on 23 Jun 1871 in Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland, died on 1 Apr 1964 in Allora, Queensland, Australia at age 92, and was buried in Apr 1964 in Allora General Cemetery, Warwick Shire, Queensland, Australia.

+ 71 F    iv. Margaret Hamilton REID was born on 16 Oct 1873 in Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland and died on 5 Nov 1886 in Mid Calder, Midlothian, Scotland at age 13.

+ 72 F    v. Janet Hamilton "Jessie" REID was born on 2 Jul 1880 in Newington, Midlothian, Scotland, died on 29 Mar 1943 in Toowoomba, Queensland, Australia at age 62, and was buried in Mar 1943 in Drayton Cemetery, Queensland, Australia.

+ 73 M    vi. David REID was born in 1881 and died in 1974 at age 93.

+ 74 M    vii. John "Jack" REID was born on 12 Jan 1882 in Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland, died in 1974 in Southport Queensland Australia at age 92, and was buried in 1974 in Mt Gravatt, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.

44. Peter REID (Isabella PATON31, William PATON28, Elizabeth ANDERSON24, Ninian19, Ninian14, Niniane2, Johne1) was born on 9 Mar 1837 in Canongate, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.

45. Matilda Russell PATTON 15 (Robert PATTON Esq33, William PATON28, Elizabeth ANDERSON24, Ninian19, Ninian14, Niniane2, Johne1) was born on 24 Mar 1826 in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland,16 was christened on 2 Apr 1826 in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland, and died in 1898 in St George, Midlothian, Scotland at age 72.

Matilda's Death Details : Y

Events

BIRTH NOTICE: The Scotsman, on 1 Apr 1826.

Matilda appeared in the household of Robert PATTON Esq in the High Street census in 1841 in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland.

1841: Matilda resided at Orkney Islands, Orkney, Scotland. 47

1871: Matilda resided at Edinburgh, Scotland. 13

1851: Matilda resided at Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland. 8

1881: Matilda was employed as, Music Teacher, in Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.
Matilda is showing as being a Music Teacher in the 1881 census.

1881: Matilda resided at 9 Hermitage Place, St George, Midlothian, Scotland. 14
It is apparent that Matilda lived with and cared for her mother in Edinburgh.

1891: Matilda resided at Edinburgh, Scotland. 48

46. Ann PATTON 17 (Robert PATTON Esq33, William PATON28, Elizabeth ANDERSON24, Ninian19, Ninian14, Niniane2, Johne1) was born on 8 Jul 1827 in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland,18 was christened on 8 Jul 1827 in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland, and died on 8 Aug 1864 in Albert Street, Kirkwall & St.Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland at age 37.

Events

Ann appeared in the household of Robert PATTON Esq in the High Street census in 1841 in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland.

1841-1851: Ann resided at Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland. 9

RESIDENCE: Main Street, in 1851, in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland. 8

1861: Ann resided at Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland. 8

RESIDENCE: Victoria Street, in 1861, in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland. 9

Ann's obituary was published in The Orkney Herald on 16 Aug 1864 in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland.
DEATHS
Died, at Albert Street, Kirkwall, on the 8th inst., Ann, daughter of Mr Robert Patton, writer, Kirkwall.

47. William PATTON 19 (Robert PATTON Esq33, William PATON28, Elizabeth ANDERSON24, Ninian19, Ninian14, Niniane2, Johne1) was born on 22 Sep 1828 in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland,20 was christened on 28 Sep 1828 in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland, and died on 17 Dec 1909 in Wandong, Victoria 375821 at age 81.

Events

Scottish Cabin Boy to Timber Cutter: 1828. 3 Synopsis

Our Patton Family has a long history in Australia, starting with the arrival of William Patton in
Australia in 1846, prior to the Federation of Australia in 1901, before the acceptance of the The Commonwealth of Australia Constitution Act 1900 (indeed many family members voted in the series of referendums held at this time) and before the birth of this Great Nation, Australia.

William Patton (son of Robert, grandson of William) was born on 22 Sep 1828 in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland, was christened on 28 Sep 1828 in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland, and died on 17 Dec 1909 in Wandong, Victoria, Australia at age 81.

William's father Robert was a "Writer To The Signet" (1797 - 1869, Solicitor), his Grand-Father William was a Baker in Kirkwall. His Grand-Mother was Annie Sinclair.

William's youngest brother Edward (1845-1877) traveled to San Franciso where he was killed,

William's youngest sister Agnes Burns Patton (1847 - 1937) married William Steell (1836 - 1917, Architect) & the son of the renowned Scottish Sculptor Sir John Robert Steell.

Residents of Kirkwall in the Orkney Islands north of Scotland have always had an affinity with the sea, so it is hardly surprising that William Patton ran away to sea.

The Patton Family were actually a wealthy family linked to the aristocracy of Edinburgh in Scotland. Regular movement between Edinburgh and the Orkney Islands was common, especially in the summer months.

Family tradition insists that he became a cabin boy at ten years of age aboard a ship, travelled to America and it was there that he was "pressganged" pressed into service for a year aboard a whaling ship. Another "family story" insists that he was keen on a young lady in the area and advised that "seeing the world" may be a favourable option. It is also proven through Scottish Census data that his actual age was probably closer to twelve or fourteen years of age when he left.

When the ship docked in Hobart, Tasmania William was able to obtain his freedom and with the lure of gold eventually made his way to Port Phillip, onboard the barque Stratheden, on January 27, 1846 (Victoria). At the time Port Phillip was part of New South Wales as this was prior to Federation. He was seventeen years of age at the time.

Some facts about the Stratheden - "Stratheden arrived Port Phillip 27 Jan for newspaper report 29 Jan, barque, 429 tons, Bruton master, from Hobart 12 Jan, Passengers J Wemyss Manley Esq., Steerage Mrs Bradley and 3 chn, James Worthing and wife, James Seaton, John Mitchell, and 50 Pentonville exiles under the supervision of Dr H Baker,
RN Jan 1846 Reported Sydney Shipping Gazette Volume 3, Number 99 (7 February, 1846) page 39."


This was nine years before the birth in 1854 of Edward "Ned" Kelly the notorious Victorian Bushranger. And 34 years before he was hanged at the Old Melbourne Gaol on the 11 November 1880 at twenty-five years of age.

Eight years past as William found his niche in Australia, at 25 years of age the Rev. William Copeland married William the and recently widowed Charlotte Palethorpe (nee Stafford) at his tent or cabin near where, on that very day December 20 1853, Governor Charles Joseph Latrobe was turning the first sod for the construction of the Yan Yean Reservoir.

The marriage certificate records that the ceremony took place at Castle Hill, Upper Plenty. Thomas Palethorpe, Charlotte's first husband had died eight months earlier.

Nearby Whittlesea was surveyed but not as yet named and 'Castle Hill' referred to a minature fortress of wattle and daub built by mistake by two servants of John Bear.

Charlotte and William lived in Glenvale until 1870 when they moved to Dry Creek or Morphetts (a man by the name of F.G.Arkell suggested the title of Wandong for this area, and it was in 1876 that the railway station and post office were provided under this name.) where William worked on railway construction. William selected land on the Western side of the roadway, near the junction of the railway line with Magpie and Stump Road just south of the present Wandong store, and began the struggle to effect sufficient improvements to qualify for title.

His three sons Robert, William and Charles all worked in the forest splitting palings while William SNR built the first store (for F.G.Arkell) in Wandong. The location is shown as [24] on the following town plan of Wandong.

Later he helped in the construction of the Comet Sawmill and Village. Both Robert and William JNR operated trucks on the timber tramway, a skilled and sometimes hazardous occupation. Towards the turn of the century traffic through Wallan was either horse or Bullock-drawn, with the occassional steam engine.

Edward John Butler recalls that "in the early 1920s he helped Fred Minchin break in bullocks for the team he used to cart firewood timber to Patton's mill at the Wallan railway station...." the author goes on to describe the general Wandong township..... "The township centred on the railway station. On the western side, The Terra-Cotta Lumber works occupied the space between the railway reserve and the main road".

An additional structure on this site was an early store (Jackson's)..... today it is the residence of John and Joseph Davern.

Across the road from the lumber works was Ryan's store, which was built by William Patton (perhaps it was originally the one built for Arkell)....." All five surviving children of Charlotte and William married.

Many descendants still live in the Wandong & Heathcote junction area whilst others a spread throughtout the world.

"I hope you will enjoy the information that I present on this website about our Patton Family Heritage in Australia" - Gary Ian Patton

William appeared in the household of Robert PATTON Esq in the High Street census in 1841 in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland.

Arrival: Stratheden, 27 Jan 1846, Port Phillip, Victoria, Australia. 49 It is believed that William may have either worked his passage or purchased a ticket aboard the Stratheden from Hobart to Port Phillip.

The 27th of January in 1846 was on a Tuesday.

Stratheden arrived Port Phillip 27 Jan for newspaper report 29 Jan, barque, 429 tons, Bruton master, from Hobart 12 Jan, Passengers J Wemyss Manley Esq., Steerage Mrs Bradley and 3 chn, James Worthing and wife, James Seaton, John Mitchell, and 50 Pentonville exiles under the supervision of Dr H Baker,
RN Jan 1846 Reported Sydney Shipping Gazette Volume 3, Number 99 (7 February, 1846) page 39.

Arrival January 27, Stratheden, barque, 431 tons, Hunter master, from Hobart Town. Passengers JW Manley Esq, fifty men from the Pentonville Prison, four privates and one corporal of the 99th Regiment; seven in the steerage.

Source - http://www.oocities.org/vic1847/ship46.html?201714

What was happening in Australia at the time?: 28 Jan 1846.
William arrived in Australia 8 years before the birth in 1854 of Edward "Ned" Kelly the notorious Victorian Bushranger.
And 34 years before Ned was hanged at the Old Melbourne Gaol on the 11 November 1880 at 25 years of age.
William's family lived through the reign of the Kelly Gang.


GOLD DISCOVERED IN BALLARAT: 1851.

Construction of the First Store in Wandong: Cir 1853, in Wandong, Victoria 3758.
William constructed the first store in Wandong for F. G. Arkell (pictured).

VICTORIA BECOMES A SEPARATE COLONY: 1 Jul 1851.

EUREKA STOCKADE IN BALLARAT: 3 Dec 1854, Ballarat, Victoria.

1860-1870: William resided at Glenvale, Victoria.

A VISUAL HISTORY: Doomed Explorers Burke & Wills, 1861, Melbourne, Victoria.

BURKE & WILLS EXPEDITION: 1861, in Melbourne, Victoria.

NEWSPAPER ARTICLE: Orkney Herald, and Weekly Advertiser and Gazette for the Orkney & Zetland Islands - St.Magnus, Kirwall Vessel in Australia, 17 Jan 1863, Port Phillip, Victoria, Australia. I wonder if William knew that the St.Magnus was in Hobson's Bay, a ship from home.
Hobson's Bay was visible from "The Scaffold" in the Plenty Ranges. Did he sneak a peak?


Orkney Herald, Tuesday 27 January 1863

A KIRKWALL VESSEL AT AUSTRALIA. - We understand that the "St Magnus," belonging to Kirkwall, was in Hobson's Bay, off Melbourne, Victoria, when the November Australian Mail left. So far as we are aware this is the first Orkney vesttel that has ever visited Port Philip Heads. Now that the "St Magnus" has got on the right tract it is more than likely that she will yield her owners a handsome dividend.

Construction of the Railway Line through Wandong & Heathcote Junction: 1869-1872, in Wandong, Victoria 3758.
William worked on the construction of the Railway Line through Wandong & Heathcote Junction.

1870-1909: William resided at Dry Creek "Morphett's" Wandong, Victoria.
William & Charlotte moved from Glenvale to Dry Creek (which was also known as "Morphett's" and is now Wandong) to work on the construction of the railway line through the area.

KELLY GANG ROB THE NATIONAL BANK IN EUROA: 10 Dec 1878, Euroa, Shire of Strathbogie, Victoria 3666.

Catapillars, Bushfires & Pigs Eating Butter: 14 Feb 1880, Upper Plenty, Victoria.
Following William & Charlotte's marriage on the 20th December 1853 at Castle Hill, Yan Yean their children Robert, Bill & Charles were registered as being born in Yan Yean, their first daughter Bessie registered as being born in Upper Plenty and their youngest daughter Lottie registered as being born in Glenvale.

William & Charlotte owned a 100 acre property called "Mount Hope", the following article printed in the Weekly Times on the 14th of February 1880 appears to be an eyewitness account of the events occurring in the 1850's and provides a wonderful insight into life in the area around that time. It also refers to some lighter moments

The Weekly Times - Upper Plenty District - 14th February 1880

A short distance below Mr. McDonald s farm is Brookland, the property of the Messrs. Gardiner, whose crop this year has totally escaped from the ravages of caterpillars. It was all cut for hay, as wool-growing and fattening stock is what is principally carried on. The sheep are of the Merino breed, and the average quantity of wool per sheep during the last few years was 61b., which brought Is. per lb. in the Melbourne market. The farm seems better adapted for sheep breeding than cattle, being nearly all of fairly grassed undulating country, well watered with a constantly-running stream.

Its extent is about 800 acres, and the homestead and outbuildings are of a complete and substantial character. Adjoining Mr. Gardiner's is the farm of Mr. Butcher, on which a mixed system of husbandry is carried on, and whose crop, composed principally of oaten hay, will, I think, turn out very well, although slightly attacked by caterpillars.

Farther down still is Mr. Clements's, where some thirty acres of a good-looking oat crop have had to be converted into hay, in consequence of the ravages of the caterpillars. A great deal of the crop, too, was so beaten down with the heavy rain which fell when it was ripening that the reaping-machine could hot work, and it had to be reaped by hand or mowed, consequently entailing a considerable loss of grain. The hay crop will probably average from 1| to 2 tons per acre, and the wheat (of which there are only four acres) above 20 bushels per acre, it being well filled and heavy. The next farm is Mr. John Rice's, and on this also the crop looked well, and, I think, will yield fully up to expectations, although visited by the caterpillar scourge.

Mr. Patton's Mount Hope adjoins Mr.Rice's, and none but those who witnessed the crop on this farm could form any idea of the destructive propensities of caterpillars.

When I saw it a few weeks ago, it had every appearance of turning out from 40 to 50 bushels to the acre ; but the whole crop was so attacked by the above-named insects that it had to be converted into sheaf hay, which will certainly average above 3 tons per acre.

In addition to twenty acres under oats, there are about ten acres and five acres respectively put in with peas and potatoes; and both of these crops look well, the former having every, appearance of averaging from 4 to 5 tons to the acre. Mount Hope takes its name from a small hill on which the homestead is built, and the farm is composed of hilly and flat land in nearly equal proportions. There was formerly a large swamp where the crops grew, but it was reclaimed some years ago, a cutting having been made through it by the Government for the purpose of conveying the water of the creek to the Plenty River. The race was originally cut only of a small width and depth, but of late years it has widened out and got much deeper through the action of the water on the loose, rich, black soil of the swamp. Mount Hope is subdivided into half-a-dozen paddocks, and about twenty cattle are kept regularly for dairy purposes, the butter, as is usual on the Plenty, being disposed of to hawkers for the Melbourne market. Over fifty acres have been sown with artificial grasses, and it is contemplated to lay down a great deal more in the course of a year or two.

Falling back from Mount Hope and continuing on towards Wallan in one direction, and Yan Yean in the other, are the Plenty Ranges, which are chiefly noted for producing the great bulk of the palings and shingles supplied to the Melbourne market. Splitting, however, has been prohibited in the greater part of them during the last few years, owing to the injury which it is supposed would be done to the water flowing into the Yan Yean from the numerous streams and watercourses in the ranges.

On a prominent hill not far from Mount Hope a scaffolding was erected some years ago by a party pf surveyors for the purpose of taking observations of the surrounding country with greater accuracy and despatch. The staging was built in tiers along the trunk of a tall tree, step-ladders reaching from the ground to the top, from which a grand view was at all times to be observed, Melbourne and the shipping in Hobson's Bay being easily discernible to the naked eye. In summer time "the scaffold," as it was generally called, formed a great resort for parties from Melbourne, and others who wished to gain some idea of the geographical and geological formation of the Plenty Ranges, and many were the names and initials carved on the tree or painted in tar, a barrel of which had been left there for the purpose, on the large rocks, stones, and logs which surrounded the base of the scaffolding.

Within the last year or two, however, the tree has fallen, and there is consequently but very little inducement now for people to visit the locality. The " Sugarloaf" and " One Tree Hill" are two other well-known places of resort of visitors to the Upper Plenty. The former is a rugged, thickly-timbered mount, with immense granite boulders of different colours and in all manners of fantastic shapes studding its sides, and forming diminutive caves and hollows, which at one time constituted almost complete security for wild goats, wombats, and wallabies. In fact, no place more forcibly reminded me, though on an exceedingly small scale, of the steep spurs and gloomy gorges of the now notorious Strathbogie and King River ranges. The " One Tree Hill," on the other hand, is clear and lightly timbered, and a good view is to be obtained from its summit of the surrounding country for many miles.

Following down the Glenvale road, another farm of 100 acres belonging to Mr. Patton is passed, and then the local post-office and State school come in view. The former occupies a prominent position on the top of a small hill, and the latter - a neat, brick building erected some fifteen years - is situated on its slope. The Glenvale road is now well formed and substantially metalled, but there is not nearly the amount of traffic on it as in past years, when the paling trade was flourishing, and when it constituted one of the principal thoroughfares for carriers taking goods to Benalla, Wangaratta, Beechworth, and many other up-country townships and new " rushes," some of which still exist, while others may now be numbered amongst the "has been" places. So great indeed was the traffic at the period above referred to, and so thoroughly unimproved the road, that it was no uncommon occurrence for bullock drays to be bogged for nearly a day at a time, and I have myself seen over forty bullocks yoked to a dray and unable to pull it out of the quagmire into which it had got stuck up to the axle-bed.

Those were, however, palmy days for the Upper Plenty, and such as will never be seen again.

From almost any point of the Glenvale road a good view can be obtained of the Plenty Ranges, and the ravages committed in the timber on their slopes by bush fires and on the ever-memorable Black Thursday are distinctly traceable by the extensive belts of tall, gaunt, bare-looking trees completely denuded of all foliage which are to be seen here and there amongst the sombre line of ranges encircling the district. Many are the tales told by old residents of the locality of the fearful scene enacted on the never-to-be-forgotten February, 1851.

At that period Mr. Patton, who had settled on the Upper Plenty some years previously, was residing within a short distance of the foot of the mountains, and, consequently, was one of the first who suffered from the fire. It had been raging for nearly three weeks, when, one scorching hot windy day, the flames, leaping from tree to tree, swept irresistibly down on the flats, and spread death and destruction in all directions.

One of the first victims of their relentless power was a carrier, whose camp was surrounded almost in a moment of time. He rushed into the long reeds near a creek to save himself, but though fresh and green the reeds soon got shrivelled, and, catching fire, the unfortunate man became enclosed with a cordon of flames, and was so severely burned that he died soon afterwards. His wife very nearly shared the same fate. In attempting to escape from the camp, she slipped and fell, and her clothes took fire, but she managed to extinguish the flames by rolling over and over on the ground, and then succeeded in reaching a place of safety. In the meantime cattle, horses, and other animals were careering madly about in search of shelter from the remorseless fury which with every gust of wind grew stronger and more terrible in its unbridled wrath. Cattle sank down exhausted after a hard gallop, and with pitiful lowings were roasted to death; while others, scarcely less fortunate, as they still struggled amidst the burning scrub to reach a waterhole or friendly belt of timber, gave vent to their sufferings in roars which could be heard high above the crackling of the flames in the gum trees, or their rapid hiss through the long dry summer grass.

Some of them lived to reach water, but only to meet death in another shape, for many got bogged and were unable to extricate themselves. Almost a whole team of bullocks perished in this way in one place, and many more were afterwards discovered which had met a similar fate. It was about 1 o'clock in the day when' the fire reached Mr. Patton 's farm. Some burning leaves blew across from the tree tops and set fire to the stacks of corn, and after that everything went off quickly. Five hundred bushels of wheat had been threshed in the barn, and a dray was ready loaded to send some to Kilmore, but in a few moments not a vestige remained of the barn, the wheat, or the dray. Just as the dwelling house caught fire, a cotiple of horses walked through from back to front. They belonged to the carrier before referred to, and were evidently stupefied with the smoke and heat. One went and laid down beside the blazing wheat-stack, where his charred remains were afterwards found, and the other was burned to death in the stockyard. After leaving their homestead, Mr. Patton's family sought shelter, a couple of miles farther down, at an hotel belonging to Mr Heffernan, which was then in the course of erection. Many other families, also burned out of house and home, be took themselves to this refuge, the strong brick walls, though not much above 4ft. high, forming a perfect safeguard against the burning leaves and red-hot cinders which ever and anon fell around them.

About 8 o'clock in the day the heat was something dreadful, and the smoke almost suffocating. Man and beast gave in from sheer exhaustion. Birds dropped down from the trees, or fell while on wing, never to rise again. Wild and tame animals and reptiles emerged from their haunts, only to be driven back and burned, or meet the same fate in attempting to escape. Few, indeed, succeeded in getting away. All nature was convulsed, and for a whole day the demon of the bottomless pit reigned triumphantly. Some assert that the thermometer went as high as 200deg., while others say it was even hotter than that ; but, judging from my own experience amoungst bush fees, I should imagine it would be fully up to the above figure, if not beyond it.

During the day some patches of country had been burnt before the fire, which, in one or two cases, by these means, was partially stopped, and a shower of rain falling at dusk, together with the changing of the wind, effectually prevented it from doing any more damage, though thousands of acres of country had been burnt, many homesteads destroyed, and several lives lost. Night came down, and then the scene was one of awful grandeur - the burning trees, logs, and shrubs glaring in the darkness amoungst the blackened surroundings, forming a weird-like picture of misery and desolation.

Even amidst all the horrors of that day and night some ludicrous incidents occurred. Before leaving the burning homestead, one of Mr. Patton's men had placed two or three casks of butter in the creek, thinking they would be safe there from the flames. So they were, but not from the attacks of some pigs which had taken refuge in the water, and made themselves at home on a meal of butter, while the surplus over and above what they digested comfortably went floating down the stream in a, species of thickened oil.

In another instance, a man was galloping away from the fire carrying a baby a few months old before him on the saddle, when he was stopped by an elderly female, who implored him to throw the child away and take up a feather bed she was carrying, which he stoutly refused to do; and consigning the old lady and her feather bed to a warmer climate than even Glenvale on Black Thursday, he put spurs to his horse and " cleared out;" at least, that is his version of the affair. The old lady, however, justifies herself by stating that she only wished the horseman to exchange burdens with her, as the feather bed was proving rather too much of a load to make any speed with in the smoke and heat, and she thought the child could be more easily carried. Which is the more likely story of the two, I leave my readers to judge.


The author of the article is unknown as the Weekly Times refers to them as "Our Travelling Reporter", which often referred to local residents who contributed to the Weekly Times.
Later Marian Elizabeth "May" Patton was known to contribute to the Weekly Times & although only 10 years at the time of this article I can't help but think of a young Lottie Patton.



POLICE CAPTURE THE KELLY GANG IN GLENROWAN: 28 Jun 1880, Glenrowan, Victoria.

Construction of Comet Village, Sawmills & Tramway: 1883, Comet Village, Wandong, Victoria.

William worked on the construction of the Comet Sawmill & Village which was owned by Robert Affleck Robertson who came to Wandong about 1880.

The Comet Mill & Village, built in 1883, was one of the largest mills ever built in Victoria at the time.

This is just after the naming of the township of Wandong, a name which was put forward by F.G. Arkell around 1878. The area previously being known as Dry Creek or Morphett's.

The Comet Village, Sawmills & Tramways were responsible for substantial amount of timber, palings & shingles to the Port Phillip area for the ever-expanding requirements for the development of Melbourne.

Comet Village truly was "a village that built a city."

The Comet Village community housed over 200 people at any one time, not only did they have homes for the married men and their families, they also had boarding house for the single men.

All of our their daily supplies, meat, milk & bread,were delivered via the tramway.

A well-stocked store where they could obtain clothing & groceries was also available.

The Owners Of Comet operate a bakery & slaughterhouse in Wandong to cater for their needs.



A VISUAL HISTORY: The infamous "BUMP" & "Harry's Nose", 1885, Comet Village, Wandong, Victoria.
The Comet Tramway was approximately 17.7 kilometres (11 miles) long.

Worked with horses it was a narrow-guage (3ft. 6in.) railway. The line was laid with sleepers, and for part of the way was light iron rails. The rest was wooden rails. Two of the horses that used to pull the cars were named M'ria & Smiley.

The "Bump" referred to the hill, "Harry's Nose" referred to the 1 in 4 incline (or decline), and that was the challenging part.

Pulley's connected to engine driven cables were set at the top of the 250ft (76 metre) high "BUMP" where the car was hitched on to the cable and let down the incline called "Harry's Nose", over a trestle viaduct, The cables are also used to winch the cars up & down the 1 in 4 incline.

It included over 20 trestle bridges, one of them 182 metres (200 yards) long crossed the Westcott Creek at a height of 16,8 metres (55ft.).

The "Bump" was located approximately half-way between the Comet Settlement and Wandong. Approximately 8 kilometres from Wandong.






Red Letter Day for the Comet Village, Sawmill & Tramway: Kilmore Free Press, 9 November 1893, 2 Nov 1893, Comet Village, Wandong, Victoria.
We will not go down without a fight.

Kilmore Free Press, 9 November 1893

COMET
(From A Correspondent)

Thursday last was a red-letter on the "Comet," when almost all the inhabitants proceeded to Melbourne by special train and waited on the Minister of Lands and the Members of the Water Supply Board for the purpose of securing permission to fell timber on the water reserve.

The owners of the Comet Saw Mill, the A.S.T. Co, have lately become aware of the-to them-painful fact their timber supply was rapidly giving out, and that unless the permission to cut on the reserve were granted the Comet Sawmill would soon be a thing of the past. And in addition to this, within the past few months their field of operations has been narrowed by the extension of the reserve for the purpose of protecting the shed of the Kilmore and Wandong water supply. At the very outside the company estimate that another two years will use up all the available timber, and even to get at all this they will be compelled to go to the expense of laying new tramways, etc.

The idea of impressing Mr McIntyre and also Mr Fitzgibbon with the importance and urgency of their claim by a deputation of the inhabitants was suggested by Mr J. Walter, the manager, and was at once taken up by the company and preparations for this unique demonstration began forthwith.

A day having been fixed and a special train arranged for to run from Wandong, Mr Walter set about devising the most comfortable and expeditious means of conveying the people from the Mill to Wandong railway station.

Pay-night was announced for the night before with result that the Manager and Mr Hall (store-keeper and clerk) found themselves overburdened with work. Of course everyone wished to look their best, and so went direct from the pay office to the store, where the demand for hats, boots, and whole suits of clothing, was excessive; however, about midnight the last customer was satisfied and the company recorded a good day in the store.

All now went off for a few hours' sleep to prepare them for the eventful day.

At 3.30 a.m. sharp the whistle aroused the slumberers and bade them prepare for the journey. Then for a few hours all was hurry and bustle. The morning which broke fine and clear, in spite of the ominous threatenings of the night before, gave promise of a lovely day.

Eight trucks were specially fitted up by the indefatigable manager and his assistants and they presented rather an attractive appearance. Seats were arranged back to back along the centre of each car, uprights were fixed with cross battens at the top, and leaves of the Australian palm were then artistically interwoven along the sides and over the tops so as to completely shelter the occupants and give them more the impression of being in neat little summer-houses than anything else.

The Comet Band had been called into requisition and the conductor, Mr G. Smith, had been at great pains to get his performers into good trim. At six o'clock alI was ready and we got under way, the Band opening its programme with " Little Annie Rooney."

Our little town presented quite a deserted appearance, only a few of the wives whom circumstances of one kind or another compelled to remain at home, and three sad-faced children, because they were out of the fun, waved adieu to us as we moved off.

With good steam up we soon reached " Catastrophe Bridge" which spans Wescott creek. The history of that bridge I may tell some future day, but I was conscious of shuddering involuntarily until the last car passed over in safety. This creek supplies perhaps the most striking part of the scenery on the route. It passes down the mountain with a fall of about one in three for a distance of about seven hundred feet, playing hide and seek among the huge boulders and overshadowed by giant ferntrees, and ever and anon scattering its foaming spray high into the air. It is certainly a sight that is not often seen and one calculated to charm any artist. On we came down hills and over creeks, where the clethauis and other wild flowers made the surrounding country quite gay.

At half-pat seven we had reached the " Bump." when the carriages were drawn up the mountain by means of a wire cable attached to the engine which forms part of a kind of saw-mill belonging to the company. Here the passengers were obliged to alight from the cars and wend their way in long procession along the narrow footpath. Forming a column about a quarter of a mile in length in single and double file they reached the summit puffing freely and hastened once more to their seats in the cars.

Another short run and we approached the city of Wandong, and the Band struck up " Over Jordon" and as it was getting warm the drummer took off his hat and tucking up his sleeves went to work with renewed energy, and the people of Wandong, who were on the look-out for our appearance, declared that they had heard the Band distinctly when we were a mile and a half from the town. As we rolled merrily in Mr R. A. Robertson met us and announced refreshments at the Coffes Palace. We found that we had taken just three hours and had had a most enjoyable trip, reaching Wandong at 9 am.

The special train drew up at 11 o'clock, and with greatly supplemented ranks we started for the city, and after lunching at the Victoria Coffee Palace we proceeded up Collins street and were received by Mr McIntyre, the deputation being introduced by Mr McKenzie, M.L.A. Mr McIntyre informed us that he was with us heart and soul but said he could do nothing as the matter lay with Mr Fitzgibbon, and our hearts sank within us as that most unbending of individuals just then entered the room. He reminded us much of the "knight of the rueful countenance" as he listened to our request and then informed us that he could do nothing without his board. Not to be outdone we arranged to wait on this " Water King" and his colleagues, and accordingly special deputation, consisting of Messrs Robertson, Walker, Moody, Gill and others, proceeded to the Board room of the Trust the same afternoon, but guerilla like the old chief with characteristic stubborness and opposition to anything that does not happen to take its rise in his own fertile intellect, crept behind his customary refuge, viz., "That the water which supplied half a million of people must be kept absolutely pure."
But at length he asked that the request be laid before the Board in writing to be dealt with at, some future day. At the same time, lest he should be convinced against his will, he declined the invitation to pay a visit to the spot. Now it is not every one who gets so great a concession from Mr Fitzgibbon, and the deputation feeling that they had scored one point at least look forward to complete success ultimately, and thinking well to be satisfied with small mercies just now returned home in good spirits to watch the progress of the scheme and
await future developments.

There can be no doubt about the fact that a firm which gives employment to so many at the present juncture should have every consideration and encouragement.

The directors of the Australian Timber Seasoning Co. again waited on Mr Fitzgibbon subsequently, and it was then decided that certain members of the Board should visit Wandong and the Comet, and satisfy themselves as to the urgency of the company's request or otherwise, and it is sincerely to be hoped that they will be favorably impressed, and that one of the most genuine and self-supporting of village settlements in the colony will not be broken up.



The Comet Settlement: The Argus, 6 Jan 1894, Comet Village, Wandong, Victoria.

A wonderful account of the Comet Village, Sawmill & Tramway from an article in The Argus, dated 6th of January 1894.

The BUMP, Harry's Nose, Smiler, M'ria and Doctor Livingstone are all in this account.


THE COMET SETTLEMENT.

By A. L. F.

The largest hardwood sawmills in Australia are situated on the Comet Creek on a little plateau in the Plenty Ranges, just about where the waters of the Yarra and the Goulburn part company.

I found myself m the midst of a curious, unique little world, complete and self-sufficing. It is a case of Mahomet going to the mountain and taking all his belongings and traps with him, too. The man who established these mills ten years ago had big ideas and saw that if the timber industry were to be managed successfully he must have a permanent staff of workmen and offer them the chance of comfortable homes and some of the advantages of civilised life

The settlement lies about 2,500ft. above sea level, and is picturesquely situated on the mountain slope, overlooking fern gullies untouched by the tourist's profane hand, while higher up above the moist bed of the numerous creeklets the graceful alsophilas raise their feathery crowns and the wild clematis hangs from tree to tree in creamy festoons. Granite boulders break through the reddish soil, which is poor and uncompromising enough. Even the native grasses are but scanty, and cattle do badly unless hand-fed.

But where the puny grasses can't find a home the stately blue gum, the mountain ash and the messmate thrive, growing with a closer, finer grain than on richer soils.

The trees as they come from the forest are lightly rolled on to the Hoffmann travelling bench, which with the touch of a finger turns these giant logs backwards and forwards under the tender mercies of the twin saws, running 500 revolutions to the minute, ripping oil huge chunks till the log is squared into a respectable-looking block and is sent on its way to undergo other reducing processes till it is turned out as quartering or railway sleepers or timbering for mines to be sent all over the colony, and even as far as Hay and Wagga Wagga. The weekly output is average at 390,000ft. super., which is taken out of 800 logs. The power to run all this machinery comes from an 18in. cylinder horizontal engine with two steel multi-tubular 16ft. boilers. I was told that £10 000 was sunk in plant and buildings.

The mills give employment to about 100 men, for, besides the sawyers, drivers, and artisans, there are nine or ten men constantly out in the forest felling trees.

It happens to be pay day, and one by one the men and boys file in, while the manager and bookkeeper, as each man answers to his name, check off the amount, and pay down the monthly wage, or, rather, the monthly balance, for the £3 5s. 9d. or £2 0s. 11d. that strike my ear as such very odd sums are the final result of an elaborate system of book- keeping, by which each man is debited with his rent or board, advances for stores, parcels, or other items.

I am not allowed to dream in a corner very long, for my energetic cicerone, Mr. Walker, is at my ear with - "Now you must see our stables." And I am taken over a luxurious establishment, or series of establishments, lofty and airy, with accommodation for over seventy horses, the floors strewn with sawdust, which can be daily swept up. "Horses couldn't do our work if they weren't well looked after." says my guide; and he points to the great bins at the far end filled with warm, moist chaff. "It's the waste steam from the engine up at the mills that is sent through the bins. Some of them will bolt their food, and we find this keeps them in good condition." There is plenty of water for cleansing purposes, too, for hosing the horses or supplying the boilers.

The creek has been tapped higher up and a small dam formed, whence water is laid on in pipes to the mills, to the stables, and to every cottage in the settlement.

I did not need to ask who was the moving spirit of this busy little human hive, for I was all the time hearing how Mr. Robertson said this and Mr. Robertson did that, but I was curious to make his acquaintance. While going through the mills he greeted me from Wandong by telephone, saying he was coming up in the evening. Yes, there is a telephone here, the wire runs from tree to tree over little insulators like castors in a rough and ready but efficient fashion.

Mr. Robert Robertson is quite a character. A sturdy block of a man with keen eyes, and overflowing with energy and vitality. A Scotchman by birth, he very early crossed over to America, and spent 15 years of his young manhood in the States and in Canada.
One story he tells of his early struggles which I must give in his own words.
"Twenty-eight years ago one cold December night I wandered down the Bowery in New York not knowing where to raise the money for a bed. I met another raw lad of my own sort in just the same plight, and we walked on together. Presently another joined us, and yet another, till there were eight of us, all young, all friendless, and among the lot not one dime to put on top of another. I suddenly remembered my valise. We pawned it, and that gave the lot bed and breakfast.
We stuck together after that. Sometimes one of us would earn a stray dollar, and the rest went shares. But among the eight was one who was yet to earn world-wide renown. His sole stock-in-trade was a manuscript, 'Adventures in Turkey.'
I went up the stairs of the Herald office with him one day, but James Bennett would have none of it, and we came down again looking pretty blue. He encountered no better luck at the Tribune. At last it was accepted by the New York Times, and on that windfall we live two or three days.
Our party shortly afterwards separated, but to cut the story short, two years ago that once struggling aspirant came to Australia, carrying with him the laurels of Darkest Africa. I wrote to him, recalling the old days, and we met at Menzies', and for an hour we talked - how we talked - over those early struggles and his wonderful career. James Bennett, the father, refused H. M. Stanley's manuscript; James Bennett, the son, marked out his career when he said to him, 'Find Livingstone.'

To return to the Comet. Ten years ago Mr. Robertson, then a sawmiller in the Bullarook Forest, thought he would seek a larger field, and made his way across country into the heart of the Plenty Ranges, taking his portable engine and sawmill plant with him. Having fixed on the best spot - the present site of the mills - the next thing was how to get the timber to the railway, or convey stores to the mountain. There was no road, and the hills were precipitous.

Neither a surveyor nor an engineer, he surveyed and constructed within twelve months a tramway 11 miles long, which has been in use ever since. Although worked with horses it is practically a narrow-guage (3ft. 6in.) railway. It includes over 20 trestle bridges, one of them 200 yards long crosses the Westcott Creek at a height of 55ft.

When built half-way to Wandong the Bump was encountered, a hill 250ft. high. To avoid making a long detour, the line was built for half a mile up the face of the hill at a gradient of 1 in 4, and an engine erected at the top hauls up the loads of timber with a wire cable.

The line is laid with sleepers, and for part of the way is light iron rails. The rest has wooden rails. These, as opportunity permits, are being replaced by iron, which lasts a life-time, whereas the wood is always wearing out, and is a constant expense. Then there are 10 miles or so of lines leading from the mill into the bush in all directions. By-and-by the main line is to be worked with a locomotive.

Last year the mills and traway - indeed the entire settlement were taken over by the Australian Seasoned Timber Company, to be worked in connection with the steam seasoning works at Wandong, but Mr. Robertson remains the practical head of the whole business. Seasoning is a subject by itself, but there is little doubt that in blue gum and mountain ash, properly treated, we have, for decorative carving, a timber rivalling English oak in fineness and beauty of grain.

The manager is always please to show visitors over the settlement, and if he had a couple of days' notice would arrange for a passenger-car to meet the train at Wandong.
It looks a rough affair, but the seats are hung on buggy springs, and there is less jolting than in an ordinary omnibus on city streets. Then, the Canadian driver, who has been seven years on the mountain, takes great pride in his fine pair of horses, harnessed tandem; show how M'ria will shake hands, and relates how the wise Smiler saved all their lives one dark night when a sleeper on the bridge gave way and a false step would have hurled tram and a dozen men, women, and children into the chasm below.

At the Bump the horses are taken out and led around a back way, while the car is hitched on to the cable and let down "Harry's Nose" over a trestle viaduct, turning a sharp corner on the way where the wire rope slips jauntily round grooved pulleys set at an angle of 45 degrees.

The town visitor will enjoy a picturesque ride in mountain air, have a thoroughly Australian welcome at the end of it, and open his eyes probably in astonishment at the big industry and the thriving comfortable little township willi its quaint original flavour and the character all its own that is the boon kind Nature gives in one way or another to those who nestle close to her, and are content to let her mother them.



AUSTRALIA BECOMES A NATION: 1 Jan 1901.

EDMUND BARTON, AUSTRALIA'S FIRST PRIME MINISTER: 1 Jan 1901.

Death Certificate: William Patton, 1909, Wandong, Victoria 3758.

His funeral was held in 1909 in Wandong, Victoria 3758.

William married Charlotte STAFFORD,50 daughter of Thomas Leonard STAFFORD 52 and Sarah MEWKILL,53 on 20 Dec 1853 in Castle Hill, Upper Plenty, Victoria.51 Charlotte was born on 8 Jun 1828 in Whissendine, Rutland, England,54 died on 10 Apr 1917 in Kilmore, Victoria 376421 at age 88, and was buried in Kilmore, Victoria 3764. The cause of her death was Broken Hip / Thigh.



Wedding Certificate: William & Charlotte's Marriage Certificate, 20 Dec 1853, Bears Castle, Yan Yean, Victoria.

Wedding Photograph: Bears Castle, 20 Dec 1853, Yan Yean, Victoria 3755.

Charlotte's Medical History :
Charlotte had a fall and broke her thigh (hip?) sometime prior to her death which would not have contributed to her well-being.
Her son Charles recorded in his obituary that she died as a result of an accident.

Events

1841: Charlotte resided at Whissendine, Rutland, England. 55

Charlotte immigrated onboard the Marion Moore on 15 Feb 1853 to Port Phillip, Victoria, Australia.
This was the maiden voyage of the Marian Moore out of Liverpool.

Charlotte's husband at the time, Thomas Palethorpe (a Smith), died on the 18th April 1853, only 2 months after having arrived in Australia..

Following the death of Thomas, Charlotte travelled to Yan Yean where she worked as a cook, she was the only "white" woman there. This was at the time when the first water works started to Melbourne.

At the time of her marriage to William she listed her "Usual" residence as being Collingwood, Victoria and included her Rank / Profession being that of Servant.

RESIDENCE: in 1860-1870, in Glenvale, Victoria.

RESIDENCE: in 1870-1909, in Dry Creek "Morphett's" Wandong, Victoria.

1903: Charlotte resided at Wandong, Victoria 3758. 56

Charlotte's obituary was published in The Age - Obituary on 23 Apr 1917.
Gone Home


PATTON.
'97 On the 10th April, at Kilmore. result ot accident, Charlotte, relict, of the late William Patton, of Upper Plenty and Wandong, and much loved mother of Chas. D. Patton, aged 60 years.
At rest.
'97Inserted by her sorrowing son and family, Wallan

1909-1914: Charlotte resided at Kilmore, Victoria 3764. 56

Children from this marriage were:

+ 75 M    i. Robert Ninian PATTON 57 was born on 12 Apr 1855 in Yan Yean, Victoria 375521 and died on 1 Mar 1932 in Kilmore, Victoria 376421 at age 76.

+ 76 M    ii. William "Will" PATTON II 58 was born on 27 Feb 1857 in Yan Yean, Victoria 3755,59 died on 30 Dec 1946 in South Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia59 at age 89, and was buried in Wallan Cemetery, Wallan, Victoria 3756.59

+ 77 M    iii. Charles Douglas PATTON 60 was born on 27 Dec 1859 in Yan Yean, Victoria 375561 and died on 17 Jul 1922 in Shaldon Cottage, Wallan East, Victoria 375621 at age 62.

+ 78 F    iv. Elizabeth Jane "Bessie" PATTON 62 was born in 1865 in Upper Plenty, Victoria,63 died in 1954 in Yarram, Shire of Wellington, Victoria 3971 at age 89, and was buried in Yarram, Shire of Wellington, Victoria 3971.

+ 79 F    v. Charlotte Matilda "Lottie" PATTON 64 was born on 30 Jun 1870 in Glenvale, Victoria, Australia,65 died on 2 Apr 1956 in Kilmore, Victoria 376421 at age 85, and was buried in Wallan, Victoria 3756.

48. Robert Russel PATON 2 (Robert PATTON Esq33, William PATON28, Elizabeth ANDERSON24, Ninian19, Ninian14, Niniane2, Johne1) was born on 28 Mar 1830 in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland, was christened on 18 Apr 1830 in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland, and died after 1860.


Robert Russel, son of Robert & Matilda (Russell) Patton, was the brother to William Patton (1828-1909) who emigrated to Australia.


Little is known of what happened to Robert, albeit that he married Hannah Cairncross Johnston in Edinburgh on the 9th January 1860. Hannah was the daughter to George & Christina Johnston from Birsay in the Orkney Islands.

On the 26th June 1860 their son Ebenezer Johnston Paton was born.

In 1861 both Hannah and Ebenezer are living in the Sailor's Home in Birsay, Orkney Islands. Was Robert a sailor and still alive at this time?

Hannah was working as a seamstress in Birsay in 1861.

20 years later, in 1881, both Hannah & Ebenezer were living at 9 Common Stair, St.George, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.

3 years later, on the 4th October 1884, Hannah Paton and her 24 year old son Ebenezer embarked for Australia onboard the vessel "PORT PHILLIP".

They arrived in Hobart on the 30th November 1884.

In 1888 in Emu Bay, Burnie, Tasmania Hannah Paton remarried to Cillstopher (Christopher?) Heinerick.

By 1890 Ebenezer owned a shop in Burnie where it was reported that a theft occurred at his shop in 1890.

On the 17th June 1891 Ebenezer married 19 year old Ellen Hannah Lapham, daughter of John & Hannah Lapham from Emu Bay, Burnie, Tasmania.

By the 1st of September 1892 Ebenezer and Ellen welcomed their daughter Hannah Ellen into the world. Sadly within 4 days on the 5th November, Ellen passed away, leaving Ebenezer with a young daughter to raise. Ellen was only 20 years of age.

Ebenezer's mother, Hannah, passed away on the 22nd February 1895 in Emu Bay, Burnie, Tasmania.

In 1896 he was living in Beltana, Monmouth, Hobart.

In December 1900 Ebenezer sailed from Hobart to Sydney onboard the "TAMBO".

On the 12th July 1904 Ebenezer remarries to Mary Belinda Sproule in Glebe, New South Wales. Mary is a Tasmanian girl from Snug River, Kingston, Tasmania and is 24 years of age at the time of their marriage.

On the 19th of November 1902, Ebenezer is listed as being "registered" with the New South Wales Department of Fisheries, where it is noted that he gives his age as being 4 years younger than he actually was, at this time he was 42 however he offered his "modified" age as 38.

In 1913 he was living at Nelson's Bay, Durham in New South Wales. It would appear that Ebenezer lived in this area through until his death on the 26th of March, 1929.

Events

Robert appeared in the household of Robert PATTON Esq in the High Street census in 1841 in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland.

INDENTURED: Princess Royal, 20 Jul 1847.
THERE IS A RECORD OF A ROBERT PATTON BEING INDENTURED IN THE MERCHANT NAVY FOR A PERIOD OF 5 YEARS TO A ROBERT SINCLAIR FROM LIVERPOOL.
IT IS UNCERTAIN AS TO WHETHER THIS IS OUR ROBERT, BUT HANNAH & EBENEZER LATER LIVING IN A SAILOR'S HOME INDICATES SOME INVOLVEMENT WITH THE NAVY OR MERCHANT NAVY.

Robert married Hannah Cairncross JOHNSTON, daughter of George JOHNSTON and Christina, on 9 Jan 1860 in Edinburgh Parish, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland. Hannah was born in 1832 in Birsay, Orkney, Scotland and died on 22 Feb 1895 in Emu Bay, Burnie. Tasmania. Australia. at age 63.

Hannah's Death Details :
Name: Hannah Heinrich
Birth Year: abt 1835
Age: 60
Death Date: 22 Feb 1895
Death Place: Tasmania
Registration Year: 1895
Registration Place: Emu Bay, Tasmania
Registration Number: 145

Events

RESIDENCE: Sailor's Home, in 1861, in Birsay, Orkney, Scotland.

1881: Hannah was employed as, Seamstress, in Birsay, Orkney, Scotland.

RESIDENCE: 9 Common Stair,, in 1881, in St George, Midlothian, Scotland.

Emigrated: Departed onboard the vessel "Port Phillip", on 4 Oct 1884, in London, England.

Arrival: Onboard the vessel, "Port Phillip", 30 Nov 1884, Hobart, Melbourne and Sydney, Australia.
Name: Hannah Paton
Estimated birth year: abt 1834
Age: 50
Arrival Date: 30 Nov 1884
Arrival Port: Hobart, Melbourne and Sydney, Australia
Departure Port: London
Ship: Port Phillip

The child from this marriage was:

+ 80 M    i. Ebenezer Johnston "Johnston" PATON was born on 26 Jun 1860 in Birsay, Orkney, Scotland, died on 26 Mar 1929 in Raymond Terrace, New South Wales at age 68, and was buried after 26 Mar 1929 in Nelson's Bay, Durham, New South Wales, Australia.

49. John Dunn PATTON 22 (Robert PATTON Esq33, William PATON28, Elizabeth ANDERSON24, Ninian19, Ninian14, Niniane2, Johne1) was born on 7 Apr 1831 in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland,22 was christened on 28 Apr 1831 in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland, and died on 26 Jan 1914 in Edinburgh, Scotland at age 82.

John Dunn Patton is shown as being a "Law Clerk"

Events

John appeared in the household of Robert PATTON Esq in the High Street census in 1841 in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland.

1871: John resided at Edinburgh, Scotland. 13

1881: John resided at Edinburgh, Scotland. 14

1891: John resided at Edinburgh, Scotland. 48

1901: John resided at Edinburgh St Bernard, Midlothian, Scotland. 66

John married Christina Marshall ROLLO,67 daughter of Ann RAS, on 19 Jan 1857 in Edinburgh, Scotland. Christina was born in 1836 in Midlothian, Edinburgh, Scotland67 and died in 1903 at age 67.

Events

1841: Christina resided at Midlothian, Edinburgh, Scotland. 68

1851: Christina resided at Edinburgh St George, Midlothian, Scotland. 8

1871: Christina resided at Edinburgh, Scotland. 13

1881: Christina resided at Edinburgh, Scotland. 14

1891: Christina resided at Edinburgh, Scotland. 48

Children from this marriage were:

+ 81 F    i. Christina Ann PATTON 69 was born on 7 Dec 1857 in Edinburgh Parish,Edinburgh,Midlothian,Scotland.69

+ 82 F    ii. Doris Agnes Clow PATTON 70 was born on 28 Apr 1861 in Leith, Midlothian, Scotland.70

+ 83 M    iii. Robert Maxwell PATTON 71 was born on 11 Feb 1863 in Edinburgh Parish, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.71

+ 84 M    iv. Edward Purves PATTON 72 was born on 21 Feb 1867 in Edinburgh Parish, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.72

+ 85 F    v. Johanna Dunn PATTON was born on 9 Jan 1871.

+ 86 M    vi. John Dunn PATTON II 73 was born on 23 Mar 1872 in Athol Cresent, Edinburgh, Scotland74 and died on 20 Oct 1905 in Colinton, Midlothian, Scotland at age 33.

+ 87 F    vii. Jessie Rollo PATTON 75 was born in 1875 in Edinburgh, Scotland.75

+ 88 F    viii. Elizabeth PATTON 76 was born in 1877 in Edinburgh, Scotland.76

+ 89 F    ix. Agnes Burns "Aggie" PATTON 77 was born on 4 Jul 1881 in Edinburgh St George, Midlothian, Scotland.77

+ 90 F    x. Agnes B PATTON 66 was born in 1882 in Edinburgh, Scotland.66


50. James Douglas PATTON (Robert PATTON Esq33, William PATON28, Elizabeth ANDERSON24, Ninian19, Ninian14, Niniane2, Johne1) was born on 25 Aug 1832 in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland and died before 1841 in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland.


James was not listed on the 1841 census with his siblings and it is based on this that he is marked as deceased until further evidence arises.

Events

RESIDENCE: Main Street, in 1851, in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland. 8

51. Elizabeth Jane PATTON 23 (Robert PATTON Esq33, William PATON28, Elizabeth ANDERSON24, Ninian19, Ninian14, Niniane2, Johne1) was born on 30 Aug 1833 in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland,24 was christened on 15 Sep 1833 in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland, and died before 1841 in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland.

Elizabeth's Birth Details :
Name: Elizabeth Jane Patton
Gender: Female
Birth Date: 30 Aug 1833
Baptism Date: 15 Sep 1833
Baptism Place: Kirkwall and St Ola,Orkney,Scotland
Father: Robert Patton
Mother: Matilda Russell
FHL Film Number: 990505


Elizabeth was not listed on the 1841 census with her siblings and it is based on this that she is marked as deceased until further evidence arises.

52. Russell PATTON 25 (Robert PATTON Esq33, William PATON28, Elizabeth ANDERSON24, Ninian19, Ninian14, Niniane2, Johne1) was born on 5 Jul 1835 in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland,8 was christened on 26 Jul 1835 in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland, and died on 21 Dec 1876 in Bathurst River, Gambia, Africa at age 41.

Events

Russell appeared in the household of Robert PATTON Esq in the High Street census in 1841 in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland.

1851: Russell resided at Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland. 8

RESIDENCE: Main Street, in 1851, in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland. 8

1859: Russell was employed as, Law Clerk, in Edinburgh, Scotland.

WORKERS WANTED IN THE GAMBIA, AFRICA: The Orkney Herald, 15 Mar 1864, Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland.
THE APPLICANTS for the Situations of BOOK-KEEPER and CLERK for the GAMBIA, West Africa, who have not yet lodged testimonials as to character, ability, &c, are requested to do so immediately.
Address (post paid) "J.C.," Herald Office, Kirkwall

EMPLOYED IN THE GAMBIA, AFRICA: Book-keeper or Clerk, in 1875, in Bathurst River, Gambia, Africa.
Russell & Ninian, were at Bathurst River, Gambia, Africa at the same time. Did Ninian return to Scotland prior to 1870 due to illness?

"British domination of the riverine areas seemed assured after 1857, but the increasing importance of peanut cultivation in Senegal prompted a new imperialism. By 1880 France controlled Senegal; in the 1870s the British attempted twice to trade the Gambia to France, but opposition at home and in the Gambia foiled these plans. Complicating matters was the series of religious conflicts, called the Soninke-Marabout Wars, lasting a half century. Only one Muslim leader, Maba, emerged who could have unified the various kingdoms, but he was killed in 1864. By 1880 the religious aspect had all but disappeared, and the conflicts were carried on by war chiefs such as Musa Mollah, Fodi Silla, and Fodi Kabba."
Source - http://resourcepage.gambia.dk/enc_hist.htm

Perhaps Ninian was lucky to escape with his life, given the death of his brother Russell.

This area of Africa was extremely volatile at this time and whilst it is not know what led to Russell's death, an uprising within this area would not have been unlikely given the political environment.

History of Bathurst River.

In 1816, Alexander Grant, the British commandant, founded Banjul as a trading post and base for suppressing the slave trade. The British renamed Banjul Island as St. Mary's Island and first named Bathurst after The 3rd Earl Bathurst, Secretary of State for War and the Colonies at the time. The name was changed to Banjul in 1973

1870: Russell resided at Bathurst River, Gambia, Africa.

Russell's obituary was published in the John O'Groat Journal - Obituary on 16 Aug 1877.
DEATHS

At Bathurst River, Gambia, Africa, on the 21st December last, Russell Patton, fifth son of the late Robert Patton, solicitor, Kirkwall.

Russell married Elizabeth "Betsey" GILLIES, daughter of Samuel GILLIES and Elizabeth SOMERVILLE, on 7 Sep 1859 in 1 Young Street, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.78 Elizabeth was born in 1831 in Midlothian, Edinburgh, Scotland.

Marriage Details: 7 Sep 1859, Edinburgh, Scotland. 78
The witnesses to the marriage were Thomas Brown (Minister), Helen Gillies and W R Margaret (sic).

Events

1841: Elizabeth resided at Bailie Fyfes Close Edinburgh Trinity College Midlothian Scotland. 79

1851: Elizabeth was employed as, Sewer, in Midlothian, Edinburgh, Scotland. 80

1861: Elizabeth resided at Islington, Middlesex, England. Betsey was staying with her sister Margaret & Brother-in-law on the night of the 1861 Census.

1861 Census

Name: Betsey Patton
Age: 28
Estimated birth year: 1833
Relation: Sister-in-law
Gender: Female
Where born: Edinboros Mid Teshire
Civil Parish: Islington
Ecclesiastical parish: St Jude
County/Island: Middlesex
Country: England


John Lessels 27
Margaret Lessels 26
John Lessels 2
George H Lessels 11/12
Betsey Patton 28
James Lessels 20

RESIDENCE: in 1870, in Bathurst River, Gambia, Africa.

53. Jane Isabel PATTON 26 (Robert PATTON Esq33, William PATON28, Elizabeth ANDERSON24, Ninian19, Ninian14, Niniane2, Johne1) was born on 17 Mar 1837 in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland27 and was christened on 7 May 1837 in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland.

Events

Jane appeared in the household of Robert PATTON Esq in the High Street census in 1841 in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland.

1851: Jane resided at Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland. 8

RESIDENCE: Main Street, in 1851, in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland. 8

1861: Jane resided at Edinburgh, Scotland. 9

1871: Jane resided at Edinburgh, Scotland. 13

Jane married James GRAHAM on 8 Apr 1871 in Edinburgh, Scotland.

Jane's Marriage Details :
Dundee Courier - Tuesday 11 April 1871

MARRIAGES.

At Edinburgh, on the 8th inst. by the Rev. Principal Candlish, Mr JAMES GRAHAM, writer, Edinburgh, to Jane, second surviving daughter of the late Mr Robert Patton, writer, Kirkwall and at the same time, Mr ROBERT PATON, London, to Ellenor, fourth surviving daughter of the late Mr Robert Patton.

Events

1871: James was employed as, Writer to the Signet (Solicitor), in Edinburgh, Scotland.

54. Charles Ninian PATTON (Robert PATTON Esq33, William PATON28, Elizabeth ANDERSON24, Ninian19, Ninian14, Niniane2, Johne1) was born on 31 Jul 1838 in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland and was christened on 12 Aug 1838 in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland.

Events

Charles appeared in the household of Robert PATTON Esq in the High Street census in 1841 in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland.

RESIDENCE: Main Street, in 1851, in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland. 8

55. May Ellinor PATTON 27 (Robert PATTON Esq33, William PATON28, Elizabeth ANDERSON24, Ninian19, Ninian14, Niniane2, Johne1) was born on 29 Aug 1839 in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland27 and died before 1871.

Events

May appeared in the household of Robert PATTON Esq in the High Street census in 1841 in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland.

1851-1861: May resided at Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland. 8

56. Charles Purves PATTON 25 (Robert PATTON Esq33, William PATON28, Elizabeth ANDERSON24, Ninian19, Ninian14, Niniane2, Johne1) was born in 1840 in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland.8

Events

Charles appeared in the household of Robert PATTON Esq in the High Street census in 1841 in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland.

1851: Charles resided at Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland. 8

57. Ninian Purves PATTON 28 (Robert PATTON Esq33, William PATON28, Elizabeth ANDERSON24, Ninian19, Ninian14, Niniane2, Johne1) was born on 3 Jan 1841 in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland,29 was christened on 3 Jan 1841 in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland, and died on 26 Feb 1870 in Edinburgh, Scotland at age 29.

Events

RESIDENCE: Main Street, in 1851, in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland. 8

1851: Ninian resided at Main Street, Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland. 8

WORKERS WANTED IN THE GAMBIA, AFRICA: The Orkney Herald, on 15 Mar 1864, in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland.

He travelled circa 1865 in Africa.

EMPLOYED IN THE GAMBIA, AFRICA: Book-keeper or Clerk, in 1865, in Bathurst River, Gambia, Africa.
Russell & Ninian, were at Bathurst River, Gambia, Africa at the same time. Did Ninian return to Scotland prior to 1870 due to illness?

"British domination of the riverine areas seemed assured after 1857, but the increasing importance of peanut cultivation in Senegal prompted a new imperialism. By 1880 France controlled Senegal; in the 1870s the British attempted twice to trade the Gambia to France, but opposition at home and in the Gambia foiled these plans. Complicating matters was the series of religious conflicts, called the Soninke-Marabout Wars, lasting a half century. Only one Muslim leader, Maba, emerged who could have unified the various kingdoms, but he was killed in 1864. By 1880 the religious aspect had all but disappeared, and the conflicts were carried on by war chiefs such as Musa Mollah, Fodi Silla, and Fodi Kabba."
Source - http://resourcepage.gambia.dk/enc_hist.htm


Perhaps Ninian was lucky to escape with his life, given the death of his brother Russell.

This area of Africa was extremely volatile at this time and whilst it is not know what led to Russell's death, an uprising within this area would not have been unlikely given the political environment.

History of Bathurst River.

In 1816, Alexander Grant, the British commandant, founded Banjul as a trading post and base for suppressing the slave trade. The British renamed Banjul Island as St. Mary's Island and first named Bathurst after The 3rd Earl Bathurst, Secretary of State for War and the Colonies at the time. The name was changed to Banjul in 1973



Ninian's obituary was published in the Orkney Herald on 8 Mar 1870.

58. Elizabeth Jane PATTON 30 (Robert PATTON Esq33, William PATON28, Elizabeth ANDERSON24, Ninian19, Ninian14, Niniane2, Johne1) was born on 8 Apr 1842 in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland4 and was christened on 24 Apr 1842 in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland.

Elizabeth's Birth Details :
Name: Elizabeth Jane Patton
Gender: Female
Birth Date: 8 Apr 1842
Baptism Date: 24 Apr 1842
Baptism Place: Kirkwall and St Ola,Orkney,Scotland
Father: Robert Patton
Mother: Matilda Russel
FHL Film Number: 990505

Elizabeth's Death Details : Y

Events

1851: Elizabeth resided at Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland. 8

RESIDENCE: Main Street, in 1851, in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland. 8

1861: Elizabeth resided at Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland. 9

RESIDENCE: Victoria Street, in 1861, in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland. 9

59. Eleanor PATTON (Robert PATTON Esq33, William PATON28, Elizabeth ANDERSON24, Ninian19, Ninian14, Niniane2, Johne1) was born on 3 Nov 1843 in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland and died on 19 Nov 1884 in London, Middlesex, England at age 41.

Events

RESIDENCE: Main Street, in 1851, in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland. 8

RESIDENCE: Victoria Street, in 1861, in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland. 9

RESIDENCE: in 1881, in St Pancras, London, England.

Eleanor's obituary was published in the Banffshire Journal, Aberdeenshire Mail, Moray, Nairn, and Inverness Review, and Northern Farmer on 25 Nov 1884.
Banffshire Journal, Aberdeenshire Mail, Moray, Nairn, and Inverness Review, and Northern Farmer, Tuesday, November 25, 1884

At London, on the 19th instant, Ellinor, wife of Robert Paton, and daughter of the late Robert Patton, solicitor, Kirkwall.

Eleanor married Robert PATON, son of Thomas PATON and Agnes WATSON, on 8 Apr 1871 in Edinburgh, Scotland. Robert was born on 10 Jun 1844 in Whitburn, West Lothian, Scotland and died in Sep 1909 in Lambeth, London, England at age 65.

Eleanor's Marriage Details :
Dundee Courier - Tuesday 11 April 1871

MARRIAGES.

At Edinburgh, on the 8th inst. by the Rev. Principal Candlish, Mr JAMES GRAHAM, writer, Edinburgh, to Jane, second surviving daughter of the late Mr Robert Patton, writer, Kirkwall and at the same time, Mr ROBERT PATON, London, to Ellenor, fourth surviving daughter of the late Mr Robert Patton.

Events

1851: Robert resided at Whitburn, West Lothian, Scotland.

1861: Robert resided at Whitburn, Linlithgowshire.

1881: Robert resided at St Pancras, London, England.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 91 M    i. Thomas PATON was born in 1873 in New Yorkshire (BS), America.

+ 92 F    ii. Matilda PATON was born on 31 Oct 1874 in Central District, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland.

+ 93 F    iii. Agnes PATON was born in 1877 in Scotland.

+ 94 M    iv. Robert PATON was born in 1879 in St Pancras, London, England.

+ 95 F    v. Jane PATON was born on 15 Feb 1882 in St Pancras, Middlesex, England.

60. Edward PATTON 31 (Robert PATTON Esq33, William PATON28, Elizabeth ANDERSON24, Ninian19, Ninian14, Niniane2, Johne1) was born on 1 Apr 1845 in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland32 and died on 16 Dec 1877 in San Francisco, California, USA3 at age 32.

Edward's Death Details : Abstracts from the Coroner's Report of Decedents' Property from the 1877-1878 San Francisco Municipal Report</b>

Twenty dollars (gold coin), 95 cents (silver coin). January 17, 1878: Delivered to Lockhard & Porter to defray funeral expenses, as authorized by Resolution No. 11,893, Board of Supervisors.

Source - http://www.sfgenealogy.com/sf/cr78.htm\\f3


San Francisco municipal reports Fiscal Year 1877-78, Ending June 30, 1878

Edward Patton
Wong Si Too


Colt's revolver, dirk knife. January 17, 1878:
Delivered coin (20 75) to Lockhart & Porter to
defray funeral expenses, as authorized by Resolu-
tion No. 11,893, Board of Supervisors. Balance re-
tained in Coroner's office as evidence in the case.

Twenty dollars (gold coin), 95 cents (silver coin). Jan-
uary 17, 1878: Delivered to Lockhart & Porter to
defray funeral expenses, as authorized "by Reso-
lution No. 11,893, Board of Supervisors.

Purse containing 75 cents, two baggage checks, match-


Source - https://archive.org/stream/sanfranciscomuni77sanfrich/sanfranciscomuni77sanfrich_djvu.txt

It would appear that a Chinaman was somehow involved at the time of Edward's death and that he too died.

From the same source above we find .......

Dec 18 1877 Wong Si Too - Purse containing 75 cents, two baggage checks, match box, salve-box and papers. December 18th: Delivered to N. Gray & Co., at request of LEE TEI QUAN, President Teong Wo Co.

Events

1851: Edward resided at Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland. 8

RESIDENCE: Main Street, in 1851, in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland. 8

1861: Edward resided at Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland. 9

RESIDENCE: Victoria Street, in 1861, in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland. 9

1871: Edward resided at Edinburgh, Scotland. 13

61. Agnes Burns PATON 33 (Robert PATTON Esq33, William PATON28, Elizabeth ANDERSON24, Ninian19, Ninian14, Niniane2, Johne1) was born on 22 May 1847 in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland33 and died on 19 Nov 1937 in 155 Dalkeith Road, Edinburgh, Scotland at age 90.

Events

1851: Agnes resided at Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland. 8

RESIDENCE: Main Street, in 1851, in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland. 8

1861: Agnes resided at Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland. 9

1871: Agnes resided at Edinburgh, Scotland. 13

RESIDENCE: Victoria Street, in 1861, in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland. 9

1891: Agnes resided at Edinburgh, Scotland. 81

1881: Agnes resided at Edinburgh St Giles, Midlothian, Scotland. 82

1901: Agnes resided at Edinburgh, Scotland. 66

Agnes married William STEELL,83 son of Sir John Robert STEELL 84 and Lady Elizabeth GRAHAM, on 2 Jun 1875 in St George's Parish, Edinburgh, Scotland. William was born on 14 Sep 183685 and died on 2 Jun 1917 in 216 Morrison Street, Edinburgh, Scotland at age 80.

Events

Son of Sir John Robert Steell, renowned Scottish Sculpto, 1836, Edinburgh, Scotland. William was an Architect
William was also the son of reknowned Scottish Sculptor's, Sir John Rober Steell. One William's few forays from Architecture into the art world of Sculpturing was the pedestal for Sir John's statue of Dr Thomas Chalmers on George Street in Edinburgh.

Below are some notes about William's father, Sir John Robert Steell..............

Sir John Robert Steell who was born in Aberdeen, but his family moved to 5 Calton Hill in Edinburgh in 1806.[2] He was one of the thirteen children (eleven surviving beyond infancy) of John Steell senior (1779-1849), a carver and guilder, and Margaret Gourlay, the daughter of William Gourlay, a Dundee shipbuilder. As the family grew they moved to a larger house at 20 Calton Hill.[3] Due to his father's own fame as a sculptor, for much of his early working career he is referred to as John Steel Junior.

Steell initially followed his father, training to be a carver himself, being apprenticed in 1818. In 1819 his father was declared bankript by the Trades of Calton, bringing much shame on the family.[4] However, John junior showed artistic talent, and despite this, the family sent him to study art at the Trustees Academy in Edinburgh, under Andrew Wilson.

Working with his father from studios at 6 Hanover Street his first major step came in 1827 when the North British Fire Insurance Company, at 1 Hanover Street, commissioned a huge timber statue of St Andrew to be placed on the outside of their office. The work appears closely based on a sketch of a statue of St Andrew in Rome by François Duquesnoy. As the office stood immediately opposite the Royal Scottish Academy it was quickly noticed by Edinburgh's artistic society, and acknowledged as a fine work. In 1829, spurred on by the success of this work, he travelled to Rome to study sculpture more intensely.

The first work to attract international attention was Alexander taming Bucephalus carved in 1832'9633 (cast in bronze in 1883, and now standing in the quadrangle of Edinburgh City Chambers). Around 1838 he was appointed as Sculptor to Her Majesty the Queen, a post which was later recognised as part of the Royal Household in Scotland.[7] In 1840 he opened Scotland's first foundry on Grove Street in Edinburgh, dedicated to sculpture, in order to cast his statue of Wellington himself.

In 1854 he commissioned a new house for himself at 24 Greenhill Gardens and lived there for the rest of his life. His fame by then was international, receiving commissions from the United States, Canada and New Zealand. Prior to this he had lived at 3 Randolph Place on the edge of the Moray Estate in Edinburgh's West End.

He exhibited at the Royal Scottish Academy and the Royal Academy, and was knighted in 1876 following the unveiling, by Queen Victoria, of his statue The Prince Consort, which stands in the centre of Charlotte Square in Edinburgh.

Sir John Robert Steell died at home, 24 Greenhill Gardens in Edinburgh's southern suburbs, on 15 September 1891 and is buried in an unmarked grave in Edinburgh's Old Calton Cemetery. This grave was purchased by his father John Steell senior and many members of the Steell and Gourlay families are also interred there.


Sir John Robert Steell's works include:

a wooden statue of St Andrew in the Dalkeith Kilwinning No. X masonic lodge, Dalkeith (1827) - the work originally at 1 Hanover Street in Edinburgh.
a bust of Wardlaw Ramsay in the Scottish Missionary Society Hall, Edinburgh, 1838
the statue of Sir Walter Scott sitting with his dog Maida under the Scott Monument, carved 1840'9646 from a single 30 ton block of Carrara marble.
a stone statue of Queen Victoria on top of the Royal Scottish Academy (originally called Edinburgh's Royal Institution), 1844.
a bust of the Duke of Wellington at Eton College, 1845.
a bust of the Duke of Wellington at Apsley House, 1846.
pediment of the Head Office of the Bank of Montreal in Montreal, 1847.
a statue of artist Allan Ramsay at the foot of The Mound in Edinburgh, 1850.
a bronze equestrian statue of the Duke of Wellington outside Register House in Edinburgh, 1852. When it was unveiled the press dubbed the statue "the Iron Duke in bronze by Steell".
the gravestone of Professor John Wilson in Dean Cemetery in Edinburgh, 1854.
a statue of Professor John Wilson in Princes Street Gardens, Edinburgh, 1856.
a statue of Lord Melville the centrepiece of Melville Street in Edinburgh, 1857.
a bust of Lord Cockburn standing in Parliament House, Edinburgh, 1857.
a statue of Lord Jeffrey also in Parliament House, 1857.
a bust of Sir John McNeill, Scottish National Portrait Gallery, Edinburgh, 1859.
a bronze bust of Florence Nightingale, on display at Derby Museum and Art Gallery, Derby, 1862.[14]
a monument to the Duke of Atholl at Blair Atholl, Perth, 1864.
a statue of Lord Dalhousie in Calcutta, 1864.
a monument to soldiers from the 93rd Sutherland Highlanders regiment who fell in the Crimean War, situated in Glasgow Cathedral, 1869.
a seated statue of Scottish national poet Robert Burns in Central Park, New York City, 1871.
a monument to Dean Ramsay east of St John's Church, on Princes Street Edinburgh, 1875.
a bust of Thomas de Quincey in the Scottish National Portrait Gallery, 1876.
a statue of Prince Albert (entitled The Prince Consort) in Charlotte Square in Edinburgh, 1876.
a statue of Robert Burns in Dunedin, New Zealand, 1877.
a statue of Dr. Thomas Chalmers in George Street, Edinburgh, 1878.
a bust of Warburton Begbie in the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh, 1879.
a seated statue of Sir Walter Scott in Central Park, New York City, 1880.
a statue of Robert Burns in Dundee, 1880.
a statue of Robert Burns on the Embankment in London, 1884.
a bust of Robert Burns in Westminster Abbey, 1885.
a bronze bas relief funerary panel of Lord and Lady Rutherfurd, and later a marble bust of Lady Rutherfurd, modelled after her death mask
a bust of Earl Grey in the Council Chambers, Edinburgh.
the statue Alexander taming Bucephalus in the courtyard in front of Edinburgh's City Chambers
a statue of early Scottish parliamentarian George Kinloch in Dundee

Source - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Steell

1841: William resided at Midlothian, Edinburgh, Scotland. 68

1861: William resided at Toxteth Park, Lancashire, England. 86

1881: William resided at Edinburgh, Scotland. 14

1891: William resided at Edinburgh, Scotland. 81

1901: William resided at Edinburgh, Scotland. 66

Children from this marriage were:

+ 96 F    i. Margaret STEELE 87 was born about 1874 in Edinburgh, Scotland.87

+ 97 F    ii. Agnes STEELL 76 was born on 28 Mar 1876 in 18 Clarence Street, Edinburgh, Scotland.76

+ 98 F    iii. Matilda Russell STEELL was born on 14 Aug 1877 in 18 Clarence Street, Edinburgh, Scotland and died on 27 Aug 1877.

+ 99 M    iv. John STEELL 88 was born on 21 Jul 1879 in 11 Clarence Street, Edinburgh, Scotland.88

+ 100 M    v. Thomas STEELE 89 was born circa 1881 in Edinburgh, Scotland.89

+ 101 M    vi. William STEELL 90 was born on 11 Apr 1882 in 11 Clarence Street, Edinburgh, Scotland.90

+ 102 F    vii. Jane STEELE 87 was born about 1878 in Edinburgh, Scotland.87

+ 103 M    viii. Henry STEELE 87 was born about 1880 in Edinburgh, Scotland.87

+ 104 M    ix. Charles STEELE 81 was born about 1887 in Edinburgh, Scotland.81

+ 105 F    x. Elizabeth Graham STEELL 91 was born in 1888 in 11 Clarence Street, Edinburgh, Scotland.91

62. Eliza PATTON (Richard John PATTON37, William PATON28, Elizabeth ANDERSON24, Ninian19, Ninian14, Niniane2, Johne1) was born on 13 Dec 1833 in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland, was christened on 29 Dec 1833 in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland, and died on 27 Apr 1896 in High Street, Leigh, Essex, England at age 62.

Eliza's Death Details : Y

Events

1851: Eliza resided at Saint Olave Hart Street, Middlesex, England.

Eliza married George William DAWSON in Jan 1868 in St.Giles, Middlesex, England.

63. Ann Sinclair PATTON (Richard John PATTON37, William PATON28, Elizabeth ANDERSON24, Ninian19, Ninian14, Niniane2, Johne1) was born on 7 Feb 1835 in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland and was christened on 19 Feb 1835 in Kirkwall & St Ola, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland.

64. Jesse PATTON 39 (Richard John PATTON37, William PATON28, Elizabeth ANDERSON24, Ninian19, Ninian14, Niniane2, Johne1) was born on 21 Jul 1837 and was christened on 13 Aug 1837 in Saint George in The East, Stepney, London, England.

65. William Richard PATTON 40 (Richard John PATTON37, William PATON28, Elizabeth ANDERSON24, Ninian19, Ninian14, Niniane2, Johne1) was born in Jan 1846 in St. Olave Hart Street, London, England41 and was christened on 29 Mar 1846 in St. Mary, Whitechapel, Stepney, London, England.42

Events

1861: William resided at Newington St Mary, Surrey, England. 34

1871: William resided at 6 Champion Terrace, Grove Lane,, Camberwell, St.Giles, London-Surrey, England. 35

66. Matilda Emily PATTON 43 (Richard John PATTON37, William PATON28, Elizabeth ANDERSON24, Ninian19, Ninian14, Niniane2, Johne1) was born in 1848 in Toner St, London, England Whitechapel St Mary,44 was christened on 16 Apr 1848 in Whitechapel St Mary, England, and died on 3 Feb 1933 in Anerley, Kent, England at age 85.

Married on Apr 1868
Married at Camberwell, London

Events

1861: Matilda resided at Newington St Mary, Surrey, England. 34

1871: Matilda resided at Gravesend, Kent, England. 92

1881: Matilda resided at Camberwell, London, England. 93

1891: Matilda resided at St George the Martyr, London, England. 94

1904: Matilda resided at Southwark West, England. 95

Matilda married Edward SCHOLEY,96 son of Thomas SCHOLEY and Ann Hannah MARTIN, in 1868. Edward was born circa 1839 in Bermondsey, Surrey, England92 and died in Jul 1873 in London, United Kingdom aged about 34.

Events

1871: Edward resided at Gravesend, Kent, England. 92

Children from this marriage were:

+ 106 F    i. Grace Matilda Emily SCHOLEY 97 was born in Apr 1869 in Camberwell, Surrey, England98 and died in Mar 1949 in Surrey Mid Eastern, Surrey, England at age 79.

+ 107 F    ii. Blanche Jessie Maud SCHOLEY 99 was born in Dec 1870 in Walworth St Peter, Newington, Surrey, England.100

Matilda next married Thomas JAMES 101 in 1871. Thomas was born circa 1841 in Stansdorey, Wales.101

Events

1881: Thomas resided at Camberwell, London, England. 93

1891: Thomas resided at St George the Martyr, London, England. 94

Children from this marriage were:

+ 108 F    i. Grace Matilda Emily SCHOLEY 97 was born in Apr 1869 in Camberwell, Surrey, England98 and died in Mar 1949 in Surrey Mid Eastern, Surrey, England at age 79.

+ 109 F    ii. Blanche Jessie Maud SCHOLEY 99 was born in Dec 1870 in Walworth St Peter, Newington, Surrey, England.100

+ 110 M    iii. David W. JAMES 93 was born about 1872 in Camberwell, Surrey, England.93

+ 111 F    iv. Florence C. JAMES 101 was born circa 1872 in Gerys Inn Rd, London, England.101

+ 112 F    v. Daisy JAMES 94 was born circa 1884 in Peckham; Camberwell.94

67. Alice Mitchell PATTON 45 (Richard John PATTON37, William PATON28, Elizabeth ANDERSON24, Ninian19, Ninian14, Niniane2, Johne1) was born in Apr 1851 in Walworth St Peter, Newington, Surrey, England.46

Events

1861: Alice resided at Newington St Mary, Surrey, England. 34

1871: Alice resided at Camberwell, Surrey, England. 35

RESIDENCE: 6 Champion Terrace, Grove Lane,, in 1871, in Camberwell, St.Giles, London-Surrey, England. 35

"I am thrilled to announce that we have now partnered with House of Names"

 
 
First online edition published by © Gary Ian Patton, 1992, revised in 2004, 2007, 2009. Current edition 2017. All rights reserved.


Home | Table of Contents | Surnames | Name List

This Web Site was Created 28 Oct 2017 with Legacy 9.0 from Millennia